CODE OF CANON LAW OF THE IMPERIAL ROMAN CHURCH

2022

The Code of Canon Law (CJCP) of the Imperial Roman Church is a compilation of the primary laws governing the infrastructure, protocol, and discipline of this Autocephalous Church.The 2022 Canons contain modifications contained in APS 3-10, ASP 1 and most of ASP 2. However, not all additions to particular law promulgated through ASP (Acta Status Pontificalis) result in an amendment, addition, or deletion from the body of Canon Law.  

Nota bene: The primary official and legal names of the Church are the Imperial Roman Church,
The Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Catholicate, The Anglican Patriarchate (of Rome), the Stato Pontificio Imperiale di Roma-Rutenia (also as the Pontifical State or Pontifical Roman State), the Apostolic See of Saints Mark and Stephen,
and the Anglican Rite Roman Catholic Church.


The Church

Can. 1.    This Code of Canon Law applies only to the Imperial Roman Church, as well as its primary entities of the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Catholicate, the Anglican Patriarchate (of Rome), the Stato Pontificio Imperiale di Roma-Rutenia (also known as the Stato Pontificio, the Stato Pontificio Romano, the Pontifical Roman State, the Pontifical States, or the Pontifical Imperial State),  and the Anglican Patriarchate of Rome, and all additional Suffragan Sees and entities.
Can. 2.   
Sec. 1.    The Imperial Roman Church (hereafter also referred to as the IRC or the Apostolic See) is an autonomous, independent, sovereign, autocephalous Church of Roman-Syrian-Byzantine origins, of the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine, Anglican, and Gallican Rites in spiritual unity with the fullness of both Orthodox and Catholic tradition. The Apostolic See of Saints Mark and Stephen follows also as the successor to the Anglican Diocese of the Southwest, founded in 1978, and also as Romano-Florentine successor to Pope St. Leo X and temporal successor of St. Peter the Apostle.
Sec. 2.    The Apostolic See, under the leadership of the Papa-Catholicos of Rome-Ruthenia, Prince of the Romans and Grand Duke of Ruthenia, also known as the Florentine Archfather or Florentine-Roman Papa, is the sole owner and leader of the Imperial Roman Church as Pontifex Maximus (Supreme Pontiff) thereof.
Sec. 3.    The Apostolic See, the Apostolic See of Saints Mark and Stephen, the See of Saint Stephen, Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Catholicate, Anglican Patriarchate (of Rome), and the Stephenian Patriarchate are all acceptable names for the Apostolic See.  The Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Catholicate is the principal jurisdiction of the Supreme Pontiff.
Sec. 4.    The territories for which the Apostolic See maintains either titular sovereignty or titular sovereign overlordship as a government in exile of the Christian Roman Empire are known as the Stato Pontificio Imperiale di Roma-Rutenia (also known as the Stato Pontificio, the Stato Pontificio Romano, the Pontifical Roman State, the Pontifical States, or the Pontifical Imperial State), the rightful ecclesiastical heir to the Roman Empire. The Stato Pontificio Imperiale, or any variant name thereof, refers both to the traditional territories of the Patrimony of St. Peter within Italy, as well as the further Imperial territories, those being the Ecclesiastical Kingdom of Etruria in the Holy Roman Empire, the Principality of Florence, the Pontifical and Imperial Kingdom of Italy, the Pontifical Kingdom of Ruthenia, the County of Valais, the County of Sainte Animie, the Prince-Archbishopric and Electorate of Würzburg, the Prince-Archbishopric and Electorate of Mainz, the Prince-Archbishopric and Electorate of Trier, the Prince-Archbishopric and Electorate of Cologne, the Grand Duchy of Frankfurt, the Principality of Santa Croce, and the various Legations, including Sicily and Naples (as Naples) and Britain (as Walsingham), as well as in the New World (as the Floridas).
Can. 3.    The Code of Particular Canon Law here presented, constitutes the totality of the Code of Canon Law of this autocephalous Church, and said Church is subject to no other ecclesiastical jurisdiction. As Catholicos, he remains the universal authority for this autocephalous church and all matters within and without pertaining or relating to it, speaking with the equivalent voice and papal authority, equal to the Bishop of Rome and the various eastern autocephalous Patriarchs.
Can. 4.   
Sec. 1.    The Imperial Roman Church consists of the clergy and congregations of the faithful duly admitted to membership, within a diocese subject to its authority. It also consists of all Bishops and their jurisdictions that are recognised by and in communion with the Apostolic See of Saints Mark and Stephen.
Sec. 2.    All regular clergy must be assigned to a diocese or archdiocese, or to the Apostolic See.
Sec. 3.    All of the laity must be assigned to a parish or organization equivalent in nature and intent to a parish, such as a Chaplaincy, as approved by the Ordinary.
Sec. 4.    The Imperial Roman Church constitutes a unique ethno-religious identity of Latino, Teutonic, Slavic, and Byzantine origin. The members of that ethno-religious identity include as well all those who are members of the Imperial Roman Church, regardless of origin.

Ecclesiastical Authority of the Church

Can. 5.    The Ecclesiastical Authority of the Imperial Roman Church and the Apostolic See is the Papa-Catholicos as Florentine Archfather, Prince of the Romans, Grand Duke and titular King of Ruthenia, Coadjutor of Rome, Legate of Christ, Supreme Pontiff, Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Catholicos, Florentine-Roman Papa, Florentine-Roman Holy Father, Anglo-Roman Metropolitan of Aquileia, Anglo-Roman Primate of Italy, and Roman Caesar Augustus, Emperor, Archprince, and Bishop of St. Stephen. The Archfather further holds the styles of Elector and titular Prince-Archbishop of Würzburg, which same may also be authorised for use by a cleric of the Pontifical Court. The Apostolic See retains in perpetuity its autocephalous authority and independent right to elect its own Bishops, as granted by special privilege and favor. 
Sec. 1.    If an Archbishop Coadjutor of the Apostolic See, known as the Coadjutor of St. Stephen, be elected, the Papa-Catholicos may cede to him for his use both the title of Cardinal Deacon of Santa Maria Antiqua and the Archbishopric of Leontopoli (but only as Vicar) during the term of his office. Said Archbishopric, however, remains part of the ecclesiastical patrimony of the Archfather. Also, if the Coadjutor is not a bishop, then the title of Leontopoli is not ceded, and if he is not a deacon, then the cardinalatial title is not ceded.   
Sec. 2.    The Papa-Catholicos as Supreme Pontiff is the sole and supreme authority of the Imperial Roman Church.
Can. 6.    The Supreme Pontiff shall be chosen in accordance with the rules established by the Code of Canon Law, to be promulgated by the Patriarchal Curia, provided that no one shall be elected without the assent of a majority of the Pontifical Electors voting according to such rules. The office is semi-hereditary, semi-elective, as outlined in the Pontifical Bulla Aulae Patriarchalis and other pontifical decrees.
Sec. 1.    Electors, appointed by the Papa-Catholicos, must take the appointed oath, in which they promise, on penalty of excommunication, to follow the precise regulations and customs pertaining to the election and coronation of the Supreme Pontiff.
Sec. 2.    The Supreme Pontiff and Papa is required to take the specified oath.
Can. 7.   
Sec. 1.    No man may be chosen as the Papa-Catholicos who is not consecrated (or who shall not be consecrated after election, if he be not yet a Bishop) in true and valid Apostolic Succession that is both Roman and Eastern.
Sec. 2.    If the Papa-Catholicos-Elect is not a Bishop at the time of his election, then the provisions of the Pontifical Bulla Aulae Patriarchalis apply regarding episcopal authority.
Sec. 3.    If the Papa-Catholicos-Elect is a Bishop at the time of his election, then he enjoys the episcopal privileges of the position immediately upon election, even before his enthronement, provided he has taken the required oath.  However, if the incumbent Archfather is living, then the Papa-Catholicos-Elect enjoys all the privileges of the rank, but does not exercise any jurisdictional authority until the incumbent Papa-Catholicos formally retires. At such time of retirement, the outgoing Papa-Catholicos enjoys the entirety of the privileges of the rank for life.
Sec. 4.    If the Papa-Catholicos-Elect is not yet a Bishop at the time of his election, he is not entitled to the rights and privileges of episcopal office until such time as he is consecrated. However, if the Papa-Catholicos is no longer living at the time of election, the Papa-Catholicos-Elect immediately assumes the jurisdictional authority of the Church upon his election, deferring all episcopal duties to a Bishop or Bishop(s) of the Curia until such time as he himself is consecrated a Bishop.
Sec. 5.    No man shall be chosen Papa-Catholicos who does not acknowledge the Coadjutor of Rome as true and valid temporal successor of St. Peter, Prince of the Apostles.
Sec. 6.    Pontifical Electors, who have the duty of electing the Papa-Catholicos and, should there be one, the Coadjutor of the Apostolic See, shall be Bishops and Prelates with ordination to the grade of Porter through Priest, within the jurisdiction of the Apostolic See named as Electors by the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 7.    Only clergy holding office within the Patriarchal Curia or the Pontifical Court may serve as Electors.
Sec. 8.    There is no minimum or maximum number of Electors that may be appointed. Each new Papa-Catholicos must appoint a new set of Electors, which may include any or all of the previous Electors at his discretion. The members of the Florentine-Roman Sacred College of Cardinals, as well as the Electors of Mainz, Trier, Cologne, and Würzburg, however, are always among the Pontifical Electors by right. The Electors of Mainz, Trier, and Cologne hold the imperial dignities of Arch-Chancellor of Germany (and of the Apostolic See), Arch-Chancellor of Gaul, and Arch-Chancellor of Italy respectively. 
Can. 8.   
Sec. 1.    During any vacancy in the Pontificate, the Ecclesiastical Authority is the Governor-General, who is the Elector of Trier and Arch-Chancellor of Gaul. If that office is vacant, the authority is the Arch-Chancellor of the Apostolic See, who is the Elector of Mainz and Arch-Chancellor of Germany. If that office is vacant, then it is the Patriarchal Curia, headed by the First Archdeacon, except that an Auxiliary Bishop of the Apostolic See, or an Episcopal Visitor from a Suffragan See to the Apostolic See, and who has been selected by the Patriarchal Curia, will provide the pastoral and liturgical duties of a Bishop during the vacancy if the First Archdeacon is not a bishop. If the office of First Archdeacon is vacant, then the leadership passes through the Curial offices in order of rank.
Sec. 2.    Said Episcopal Visitor referenced in Sec. 1 of this canon shall not, by virtue of his invitation to act as Visitor, succeed to any non-pastoral or non-liturgical duty, power or authority normally exercised by the Papa-Catholicos. These authorities are vested in the Governor-General, Arch-Chancellor of the Apostolic See, or Curia as detailed in Sec. 1.   
Can. 9.   
Sec. 1.    If a Coadjutor has been named for the Apostolic See, then the Coadjutor shall automatically succeed to the office of Supreme Pontiff, should that office become vacant and he be not impeded by provisions of Canon Law. His succession must be confirmed by the Pontifical Electors, who shall not fail to issue such a confirmation provided there be not a canonical impediment as outlined in the Code of Canon Law. 
Sec. 2.    If a Coadjutor of the Apostolic See is to be elected, it must be in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Code of Canon Law. 
Sec. 3.    A Coadjutor must further qualify for his office under Canon 7. That is, in order to be eligible for election as the Coadjutor of the Apostolic See, a cleric must be also canonically eligible for election as Papa-Catholicos. He must, upon becoming Coadjutor, follow the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite or the Anglican-Byzantine Rite, those being the principle Rites of the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 4.    The Coadjutor of the Apostolic See has the style of an Archbishop and all rights thereof, including the pallium, regardless of liturgical Rite, provided that he is already a bishop or else is consecrated as a bishop after his election. If the title of Cardinal Deacon of Santa Maria Antiqua is ceded to him for his use, if he is ordained at least as a deacon, then he holds the style of a Cardinal; and likewise if he is appointed to another Cardinalatial title; and in which case he is styled as the Cardinal Coadjutor of the Apostolic See. The Coadjutor, however, need only be a tonsured cleric, due to the succession law of the Apostolic See of Saints Stephen and Mark and the Pontifical Imperial State. A Coadjutor must be at least 18 years of age. However, it is possible to designate an heir apparent according to the succession law; and if such an heir of the Papa-Catholicos exists, then, if a Coadjutor is designated, it must be that heir apparent who is chosen.
Sec. 5.    The Governor-General of the Stato Pontificio Imperiale, when such office is appointed, holds the style and dignity of Elector and titular Prince-Archbishop of Trier in the Holy Roman Empire, with all rights and privileges of that office, and shall be responsibly for the oversight of the temporal patrimony of Saints Peter and Stephen. The office of Governor-General and Elector of Trier are linked together, and thus to hold one is to hold both.
Sec. 6.    The Governor-General shall, immediately upon appointment by the Papa-Catholicos, be consecrated bishop according to an approved Rite, and invested with the pallium if he is not already a bishop. He shall then be invested as Prince Archbishop of Trier and Governor-General of the Stato Pontificio Imperiale. The Governor-General is further the operational head of the Curia (where the First Archdeacon is the administrative head) and, by extension, the Imperial Roman Church. His jurisdiction, symbolized by the mozzetta, worn over the mantelletta, is an extension of that of the Papa-Catholicos. While the Prince Archbishop may retire, it is considered a position for life. If he does, however, retire, then he retains the privileges of office except for the mozzetta (unless otherwise entitled to it), and uses the style of Prince Archbishop Emeritus.
Sec. 7.    The Arch-Chancellor of the Apostolic See, when appointed, holds the style and dignity of Elector and titular Prince-Archbishop of Mainz in the Holy Roman Empire, enjoys the same rights and privileges as the Governor-General. He shall have the duty of overseeing the administrative work of the Apostolic See.  While the Prince Archbishop may retire, it is considered a position for life. If he does, however, retire, then he retains the privileges of office except for the (unless otherwise entitled to it), and uses the style of Prince Archbishop Emeritus. The office of Arch-Chancellor and Elector of Mainz are linked together, and thus to hold one is to hold both. It is, however, permitted that a cleric be appointed as Elector, even if not yet consecrated a bishop. In such a case, he holds the same privileges of the Prince-Archbishop, except for the pallium and other items as may be specified in decretals, and does not enjoy the privilege or right to exercise specifically episcopal authority. 

The Patriarchal Curia

Can. 10.    The Patriarchal Curia consists of the First Archdeacon (who is administrative head of the Curia), the Dean and Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter (known as the Pontifical Order of St. Stephen), the Prefects and their specific officers, clergy named to specific offices of the Curia, and lay officials appointed by the Papa-Catholicos according to Canon Law. The Dean of the Patriarchal Chapter is the senior-most cleric of the Chapter. The Office of Vicar-General of the Apostolic See is held by a Bishop who is appointed a titular Archbishop of the Apostolic See. The duties of the Vicariate-General are to tend to the pastoral matters of the Apostolic See, as well as to provide pastoral leadership to Patriarchal Basilicas and any diocese directly subject to the Apostolic See. The (Pontifical) Council for the Laity is a subordinate office within the Vicariate-General.  
Sec. 1.    The First Archdeacon (if not a Bishop) and Deans of the Apostolic See shall enjoy the rank and privilege of Prelate Nullius  with the rights and privileges thereunto appertaining.
Sec. 2.    The Prefect-General  serves as the prime minister over the government of the Stato Pontificio Imperiale and is appointed by the Archfather, and may be a cleric or lay official. The Prefect-General also holds the style, rank, and dignity of Senator of Florence.
Can. 11.    Membership in the Curia applies only to those holding specific Curial Offices. In the case of those holding specific offices within the Prefectures, only those who are the Deputies to the Prefect, the Prefectural Vicar, and the Chancellor and Vice Chancellor(s) of the Prefecture, as well as the Judges of the Supreme Holy Office and the Auditors of the Florentine Rota (but not the Associate Auditors or Associate Judges of either Tribunal), and other officers as specifically authorized by the Papa-Catholicos shall be deemed members of the Curia.
Can. 12.    The duties of the Patriarchal Curia are to assist the Papa-Catholicos in the fulfillment of the governmental aspects of his ministry, to recommend amendment as needed of portions of the Code of Canon Law to the Papa-Catholicos for his sole approval, to facilitate the election of Bishops in the Suffragan Sees, in accordance with the Canons, to carry out the duties of specific committees and offices, to adopt budgets that provide for the work of the Church, to levy assessments on Suffragan Sees, and to approve terms of affiliation of the Imperial Roman Church with other Churches or entities or governments (such terms must contain the specific right of the Apostolic See to sever the relationship by action of the Supreme Pontiff).
Can. 13.    The Papa-Catholicos may appoint the officers of the Curia and appoint a replacement when a vacancy occurs in an office. The offices are defined according to Canon Law. New offices may be established by act of the Papa-Catholicos, either for a time or permanently. Offices may be suppressed by the Papa-Catholicos as needed.
Can. 14.    The First Archdeacon shall administratively head the Patriarchal Curia for purposes of infrastructural organisation and shall be chief administrative adviser and assistant to the Papa-Catholicos. He shall be a cleric of any order. 
Sec. 1.    The First Archdeacon shall serve as the Prefect of the Pontifical Secretariat, the broad office responsible for administrative matters of the Patriarchal Curia.
Sec. 2.    Should the office of First Archdeacon be vacant, the duties of the First Archdeacon are vested in the Chancellor of the Pontifical Court as outlined in law.
Can. 15.    The Chancellor of the Pontifical Court (of Saint Mary of Walsingham) shall head the Chancery of the Patriarchal Curia and handle all duties appointed to that office, including but not limited to maintaining the archives and handling and certifying official documents. The Chancellor may be a Bishop, a Priest, a Deacon, or a cleric in Minor Orders.
Sec. 1.    The Chancellor may be appointed to serve as Pro-Prefect of the Secretariat, unless he is a Bishop.
Sec. 2.    If the Chancellor serves as head of the Secretariat, then he uses the title of Pro-Prefect, unless he is a Bishop, in which case he uses the title of Prefect.
Can. 16.    The Prefects shall be prelates and in the clerical state, even in the Minor Orders or a tonsured cleric, and shall be appointed to one of the specific offices provided under Canon Law. Each such prelate who is not a Bishop shall be appointed a Canon of the Patriarchal Chapter in the Nobile Anticamera Segreta. The Prefect of Faith and Doctrine, however, must be consecrated a Bishop; and he is further named a titular Archbishop of the Apostolic See. Though part of the Patriarchal Curia, the Prefects are independent of the First Archdeacon or other offices and officers and are directly under and report directly to the Papa-Catholicos.  
Can. 17.    The Prefect of Faith and Doctrine shall be responsible for all matters of faith and doctrine in the Apostolic See and its Suffragan Sees. He is responsible for ensuring orthodoxy of faith and doctrine is maintained. The Council of the Clergy and the Council for the Consecrated and Religious Life exist as subordinate offices within this Prefecture. The Prefect shall serve as the Chief Judge of the Supreme Holy Office. Within the Prefecture shall be the Supreme Holy Office, which shall be the supreme ecclesiastical court of the Imperial Roman Church. Said tribunal shall be primarily a court of appeals for decisions by the Florentine Rota and the Patriarchal Penitentiary, but may also hear matters of supreme importance to the Faith and the doctrine thereof as a court of first instance. The decisions of this tribunal may be appealed only to the Supreme Pontiff as supreme authority. The Supreme Holy Office shall consist of Judges appointed by the Prefect and Associate Judges, as well as other officers as deemed necessary according to its rules of operation. Each session of the Supreme Holy Office must have presiding at least the Chief Judge or a Judge.
Sec. 1.    If the office of Prefect of Faith and Doctrine is vacant, then its leadership is vested directly with the Papa-Catholicos. In this case, the leadership of the Supreme Holy Office is likewise vested directly with the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 18.    The First Archdeacon, as Prefect of the Secretariat, shall head the Secretariat, the office responsible for all matters of administration, diplomacy, inter-jurisdictional relationships, and government matters. Within the Pontifical Secretariat shall be the Church’s Diplomatic Corps to further the work of the Secretariat and of the Church as a whole in the world.
Sec. 1.    Another cleric in the Curia who is not a bishop may be appointed as Pro-Prefect to assist the First Archdeacon.
Sec. 2.    The organisation of the Pontifical Secretariat shall be established by policy, with the approval of the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 19.    The Patriarchal Penitentiary Major shall head the Tribunal of the Patriarchal Penitentiary. The Tribunal of the Patriarchal Penitentiary shall rank above the Florentine Rota and is headed by a Penitentiary Major, who must be a prelate in the clerical state, even in the Minor Orders or a tonsured cleric. If the Penitentiary Major is not a Bishop, he shall be appointed a Canon of the Patriarchal Chapter.  The Penitentiary is responsible for maintaining lists of indulgenced acts, granting indulgences formally when so required, hearing disputes regarding penance, hearing cases for dispensations from sacramental form, and other duties as required. Such cases are heard by the Penitentiary Major or a Deputy Penitentiary Major. However, only the Penitentiary Major himself may grant dispensations. A Deputy Penitentiary Major may submit recommendations to the Penitentiary Major. Metropolitan Sees and Dioceses may maintain a similar office for the purpose of local matters of penance, but if such an office is established, it may not render decisions on dispensation from impediments and other sacramental matters.
Sec. 1.    The duties of the Patriarchal Penitentiary, if the office of Penitentiary Major is vacant, may be vested directly with the Papa-Catholicos, who may either choose to convene said tribunal on an as-needed basis, or reserve its duties to himself.
Can. 20.   
Sec. 1.    The Prefect of the Florentine Rota shall lead the Florentine Rota. This tribunal is the primary court of the Apostolic See and the Imperial Roman Church, responsible for hearing cases of annulment, heresy, and other internal matters. Matters brought to this tribunal usually are intended to have been heard by a Metropolitan Tribunal, but it may at its discretion hear cases as a court of first instance. The Prefect is the Chief Auditor of the Florentine Rota. Also there may be appointed Auditors of the Florentine Rota and Associate Auditor. Each session of the Tribunal must be presided over by at least the Prefect or an Auditor.
Sec. 2.    The Judicial Vicar (who must be a cleric  learned  in civil and canon law, to be the advisor to the Papa-Catholicos in ecclesiastical legal matters), shall serve as head of the Florentine Rota in the event that a Prefect is not appointed and is himself an Auditor of the Florentine Rota ex officio. If there is a Prefect, then the Judicial Vicar is the administrative head of the Tribunal and is responsible for its operations, holding the style of Vice-Prefect.
Sec. 3.    If the office of Prefect of the Florentine Rota is vacant, the duties of the Florentine Rota may be vested at the discretion of the Papa-Catholicos in the Tribunal of the Patriarchal Penitentiary. In such a case, the Penitentiary Major may either convene the Florentine Rota on an as-needed basis or else reserve the jurisdiction of that tribunal to the Penitentiary.  
Can. 21.     The Prefect of the Liturgy shall be responsible for ensuring liturgical practices are in accordance with the Canons, Sacred Scripture, and Sacred Tradition, for the good of the Church and all the faithful. Recommended changes to liturgy not originating with the Archfather first must be submitted to this office for review and recommendation to the Supreme Pontiff.
Sec. 1.    The Prefecture of the Liturgy, while enjoying all the rights and privileges of a prefecture, is a subordinate congregation of the Prefecture of Faith and Doctrine. In the absence of an appointed Prefect of the Liturgy, the Prefecture of Faith and Doctrine shall have all the responsibilities of the Prefecture of the Liturgy.
Sec. 2.    If the office of Prefect of the Liturgy is vacant, the leadership of the prefecture and/or the duties of the prefecture may be vested in the Prefecture of Faith and Doctrine.
Can. 22.    The Prefect of Education shall be responsible for all matters pertaining to education in the Imperial Roman Church, including but not limited to seminaries and priestly formation.
Sec. 1.    The Prefecture of Education, while enjoying all the rights and privileges of a prefecture, is a subordinate congregation of the Prefecture of Faith and Doctrine. In the absence of an appointed Prefect of Education, the Prefecture of Faith and Doctrine shall have all the responsibilities of the Prefecture of the Education.
Sec. 2.    If the office of Prefect of the Education is vacant, the leadership of the prefecture and/or the duties of the prefecture may be vested in the Prefecture of Faith and Doctrine.
Can. 23.     The Elemosiniere Segreto, who leads the Patriarchal Aerarium, shall be the principal financial official of the Apostolic See, with the primary responsibility of managing the charitable functions of the Church. This Prefecture, while maintaining all the rights and privileges thereof, is a subordinate congregation of the Secretariat. In the absence of an appointed Elemosiniere Segreto, then the Secretariat shall assume all responsibilities of the Aerariuam. 
Can. 24.    Other Prefectures and offices may be established by the Papa-Catholicos for the need of the Church and favour of the Faith, either permanently or on an ad hoc basis.
Sec. 1.    Councils may be established to perform certain functions that are either advisory or legal.
Sec. 2.    Commissions may be established to perform specific functions and are not advisory in nature.
Sec. 3.    Committees may be established to carry out specific functions and, like commissions, are not advisory in nature. A committee differs from a commission in that it is more narrow in focus. It may pertain to a sub-function of a commission, or it may be entirely independent.
Can. 25.    Other offices of the Patriarchal Curia include the Secretary of the Patriarchal Curia, the Treasurer of the Patriarchal Curia, who shall serve under the Elemosiniere Segreto and further fulfill the charitable duties of the Prefecture if no Prefect is appointed, and other officers as deemed necessary.
Can. 26.    The Chancellor, Vicar-General, Judicial Vicar,  the Secretary, the Treasurer, and the other offices that comprise the Curia may be priests or deacons, or men in Minor Orders.
Can. 27.     The officers of the Curia rank in this order of precedence, from highest to lowest: The Prefects, in their order of office as given in Canon Law (Faith and Doctrine, Secretariat, Patriarchal Penitentiary, Florentine Rota, Liturgy, Education, and the Aerarium), the Chancellor, Deputy Chancellor(s), the Secretary, the Treasurer, and other offices in order of creation of the office, or as determined by papal authority.   
Sec. 1.    The Coadjutor of the Apostolic See ranks immediately after the Papa-Catholicos, even if not a Cardinal; and the Governor-General ranks immediately either immediately after the College of Cardinals if not himself a cardinal or immediately after the Coadjutor of the Apostolic See if a cardinal; and the Arch-Chancellor immediately there-following, likewise dependent upon whether or not he is a cardinal. The Vicar-General ranks immediately after the Arch-Chancellor, also dependent upon whether or not he is a cardinal. These officials are senior-most in rank within the Curia and rank above all other members of the Curia. However, if any of the aforementioned officials be Cardinals, then they rank instead immediately after the Papa-Catholicos, along with the other members of the Sacred College.

The Bishops of the Church and the Pontifical Court

Can. 28.      
Sec. 1.    The Imperial Roman Church comprises the churches of all Bishops, whatever their traditional Rite, in communion with the Apostolic See and Papa-Catholicos of Rome-Ruthenia.
Sec. 2.    The College of Bishops consists of all Bishops within all jurisdictions under the authority of the Apostolic See, viz., the Imperial Roman Church. The College of Bishops may be convened in Episcopal Council, either in whole or in part, by the Papa-Catholicos in order to advise or decide certain matters of importance to the Church as a whole.
Sec. 3.   Each Rite may have its own Episcopal Council, with approval of the Papa-Catholicos. Each Rite may, with approval of the Papa-Catholicos, be led by a Primate, Patriarch, Major Archbishop, or other such office as determined according to tradition and Canon Law. 
Sec 4.    Each Metropolitan Archbishop and Bishop Ordinary shall report on the affairs of his Archdiocese or Diocese to the Archfather no less frequently than at five-year intervals. These reports must be given in person in an audience with the Papa-Catholicos. If the Bishop is lawfully unable to present the report in person, he may send a representative, or else another means of conducting the audience may be approved in case of legitimate reason.
Can. 29.   
Sec. 1.    The Pontifical Court, which bears the alternative appellation of the Court of Saint Mary of Walsingham, is headed administratively by the First Archdeacon, acting on behalf of the Archfather. Its formal head is the Dean of the Patriarchal Chapter (Pontifical Order of St. Stephen).
Sec. 2.    The Governor-General, Arch-Chancellor, First Archdeacon, Prefect-General, and the Chancellor of the Apostolic See, by the virtue of their office, are both members of the Curia and the Court.
Sec. 3.    The precise organisation of the Pontifical Court is defined by policy as approved by the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 4.    All Capitular Bishops and Archbishops of the Apostolic See of the Imperial Roman Church (also known as Capitular Bishops and Archbishop of St. Stephen) who are not jurisdictional or Suffragan Bishops or Archbishops of a Suffragan See are members of the Pontifical Court. However, a Bishop Ordinary or Suffragan Bishop of a diocese or a Metropolitan Archbishop may be additionally appointed to the Pontifical Court and Patriarchal Chapter through appointment as a Capitular Bishop or Archbishop.
Sec. 5.    The Patriarchal Chapter comprises the senior part of the Pontifical Court, after the Sacred College of Cardinals. The Prelates di Fiocchetto retain the highest rank of the Pontifical Court below the dignity of Cardinal. Those prelates are definted as: the Governor-General, the Arch-Chancellor of the Apostolic See, the Prefect of Faith and Doctrine, the Elemosiniere Segreto, the Treasurer of the Patriarchal Curia, the First Archdeacon, the Prefect-General of the Stato Pontificio (if a cleric), and the Pontifical Maggiordomo (if a cleric); though the style of Prelate di Fiocchetto is not used if the said cleric be also a cardinal. The Canons of the Chapter are in the ranks of Canon Priest, Canon Deacon, Canon Sub-Deacon, and Canon Cleric. A cleric must hold the level of ordination at least as high as the level of canon title to which he is appointed.
Sec. 6.    The Papa-Catholicos may appoint Chamberlains of the Pontifical Court, which office shall rank within the prelature of the Pontifical Court. Chamberlains are not, however, members of the Patriarchal Chapter. The Chamberlains are entitled to the style of Reverend Monsignor while in office, as well as the following vesture, unless they hold a higher rank entitling them to other prelatial dress: for a house cassock, the black cassock trimmed with red and with red buttons, the black biretta and zucchetto, and a Roman purple fascia. For choir dress, a Roman purple cassock and fascia, without rochet or surplice, and the Roman purple mantellone worn directly over the cassock. The rochet is not worn. Chamberlains must be at least ordained to the Minor Orders.
Sec. 7.    The Papa-Catholicos may appoint other such offices as deemed necessary within the Pontifical Court by papal decree defining their terms, duties, and privileges.
Sec. 8.    The order of precedence within the Pontifical Court is as follows, from senior to junior: Archbishop Coadjutor of the Apostolic See; Cardinals; the Governor-General; the Arch-Chancellor; the First Archdeacon; the other Prelates di Fiocchetto; Capitular Archbishops of the Apostolic See in order of date of rank; Capitular Bishops of the Apostolic See in order of date of rank; the Chancellor; Deans ad honorem of the Patriarchal Chapter; the Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter in order first of Holy Orders (priests ranking first, then deacons, then sub-deacons, then acolytes, then exorcists, then lectors, and then porters), and then within each level of Holy Orders, by date of rank; then Chamberlains who do not have a higher prelatial dignity, in order first of Holy Orders, and then within each level by date of rank; then other members, clerical and lay, as defined in decree approved by the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 9.    The Pontifical Court has the privilege of processing immediately before the Supreme Pontiff in Sacred Liturgy, except that if other Ministers and assistants are required by the rubrics, then the Court shall process immediately in front of them. In processions in which the Papa-Catholicos processes first, the Court has the right to process immediately behind him, except where otherwise dictated by the rubrics and ceremonial norm or directives of the Master of Pontifical Ceremonies.     
Sec. 10.    The nobility of the immediate patrimony of Saints Peter and Stephen as well as others designated Peers of St. Stephen automatically hold the dignity of Noble of the Nobile Anticamera Segreta. Those in direct service may be designated as Nobles in Service at the Patriarchal Throne, Chamberlains of Honour, and other offices so designated.
Sec. 11.    The Papa-Catholicos may appoint clerics as as Cardinals in the Florentine-Roman Sacred College of Cardinals, to enjoy all the privileges thereof. The ranks of Cardinals are Cardinal Bishop, Cardinal Priest, Cardinal Deacon, Cardinal Sub-Deacon, and Cardinal Cleric. A cleric must hold the level of ordination at least as high as the level of cardinalatial title to which he is appointed.

Suffragan Sees of the Church

Can. 30.    Under the ecclesiastical governance of the Apostolic See of Saints Mark and Stephen, of which the See of St. Stephen has as its specific territory the area coterminous with the Diocese of Rome as the Coadjutorship of Rome, may be Metropolitan Sees, otherwise known as Metropolitan Archdioceses. Within the Ecclesiastical Province governed by each Metropolitan See there may be one or more additional dioceses.  The dioceses and Metropolitan Sees may be erected for the purpose of furthering the faith under through the Imperial Roman Church. 
Can. 31.    A Metropolitan See is responsible both for administration of its own organization for the pastoral care of parishes in its territory, but also for providing Metropolitan oversight of the Suffragan dioceses within the territory of its ecclesiastical province and scope of authority.  A Metropolitan See or Archdiocese is under the leadership of a Metropolitan Archbishop, chosen in accordance with Canon Law. In each Metropolitan See, there may be Suffragan Bishops of that Archdiocese, and there may be an Archbishop Coadjutor, if provided in Metropolitan Particular Canon Law. All Metropolitans must be approved and confirmed to their through Apostolic Mandate by the Papa-Catholicos. 
Can. 32.    A Diocese is a particular church in a specific geographical area. The primary function of a diocese is administration of its own organization to provide for the pastoral care and organization of parishes within its territory. A Diocese is under the leadership of a Bishop Ordinary, chosen in accordance with Canon Law. A Bishop Ordinary is himself a Suffragan Bishop to the Metropolitan Archbishop in whose territory his diocese is located. There may additionally be one or more Suffragan Bishops of a Diocese, as well as a Coadjutor, if provided in the Diocesan Particular Canon Law. All Bishops of any rank must be approved and confirmed in office and orders through Apostolic mandate by the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 33.   
Sec. 1.    Each Metropolitan See and Diocese should organize a Curia and infrastructure in accordance with the letter and intent of Canon Law, following the general model of the Apostolic See in a manner appropriate for a Metropolitan See or Diocese.
Sec. 2.    Metropolitans Sees and Dioceses shall not maintain Prefectures, the status of which is limited to the Patriarchal Curia. However, each Metropolitan See and Diocese should have similar offices as given in Sec. 3.
Sec. 3.    Each Metropolitan See and Diocese should maintain a Metropolitan Tribunal and a Diocesan Tribunal respectively. Both may maintain a single appellate tribunal, which may be in practice a different rotation of the Metropolitan or Diocesan Tribunal. Each Metropolitan See and Diocese should further maintain offices in Faith and Doctrine, the Sacred Liturgy, education, mission and works, and other offices as needed, except those that are specifically prohibited by the Apostolic Se of Sts. Mark and Stephen.
Sec. 4.    No Metropolitan See or Diocese shall maintain a Secretariat, the diplomatic functions of which are restricted to the Apostolic See. A Metropolitan See or Diocese may maintain an office of external affairs, under the name of office of external affairs or some similar name, for the purpose of interacting with local governments and organizations, provided such interaction is in accordance with the Code of Canon Law and the policies and directives of the Papa-Catholicos and the Pontifical Secretariat. A Metropolitan See or Diocese may further maintain an administrative office of suitable name for the purpose of assisting the Metropolitan or Bishop Ordinary in administering his diocese. 
Sec. 5.    Each Archbishop or Bishop Ordinary should visit each parish within his territory at least once in each five-year period. This visit should be in accordance with the norms for a Pastoral Visit, in which both the liturgy of a Pastoral Visit is conducted and the Bishop receives a report on the affairs and status of the parish. For a Metropolitan Archbishop, this requirement of pastoral visitation refers specifically to parishes under his direct pastoral care and not under the care of a Bishop Ordinary. Metropolitan Archbishops, however, are expected to visit as many parishes within the entirety of their Province as is reasonably possible. This duty may be delegated as necessary to an auxiliary bishop.
Sec. 6.    Each Bishop Ordinary shall report on the affairs of his diocese, in person if possible, to their Metropolitan no less than once every five years. If a visit in person is not possible, then the report may be made in writing, or the Ordinary may send a representative.
Sec. 7.    The Papa-Catholicos may require a report of any member of the clergy at any time. A Metropolitan Archbishop or Bishop Ordinary may require a report of any member of the clergy under their leadership at any time. 
Can. 34.   
Sec. 1.    A parish is a congregation of the faithful under the leadership of a priest known as the Rector. The Rector is chosen in accordance with Canon Law. A Rector may have one or more Curates or Parochial Vicars, who shall be priests assisting him at the parish. Deacons may be assigned by the Bishop Ordinary or Archbishop (for an Archdiocese) to a particular parish. There may be other clergy within a parish from the Minor Orders to assist with the pastoral duties of that parish and to assist the Rector.
Sec. 2.    In the event that a Rector is not assigned to a particular parish, that parish may be assigned by the Bishop Ordinary to the leadership of a Deacon, known as the Deacon-in-Charge.
Sec. 3.    Parishes without any clergy in Major Orders revert to the Bishop Ordinary or Archbishop (for an Archdiocese). In such a case, the temporal aspects of the parish may be given to the laity or, if possible, to a cleric commissioned to the Minor Orders.
Sec. 4.    Parishes are intended to be geographical. The faithful are intended to attend and participate in the parish life primarily of the parish closest to them geographically. Exceptions to this may be granted by the Bishop Ordinary for pastoral reasons.
Can. 35.       A Diocese or Archdiocese, while normally geographical in nature, may be established around a certain purpose, e.g., a military See for chaplains. In such a case, persons become members of the See not by means of geographical location, but by unity of purpose.
Can. 36.    A parish-like organization, usually under the name of a Chaplaincy, may be organized to function in a manner similar to that of a parish, not according to geographical location, but rather for a specific purpose.
Can. 37.    A Personal Prelature may be established by decree of the Supreme Pontiff of the Imperial Roman Church, under the leadership of either a Bishop or another Prelate, to function similar to a diocese, but for a specific purpose and not generally by geography.
Can. 38.    Religious orders may have their own organization, according to their own rules, provided that they do not violate Canon Law. Religious are under the supervision and authority of their Superiors. However, the Superior of an order within a particular diocese is subject to the authority of the Bishop Ordinary except where otherwise provided by Canon Law.
Can. 39.   
Sec. 1.    Each Metropolitan See and Diocese shall maintain a Council of Clergy, which shall consist of all members of the jurisdiction in Major Holy Orders, viz., Deacon, Priest, and Bishop, as well as the Superiors of Religious Orders under the spiritual jurisdiction and/or guidance and support of the See, as well as all clerics commissioned to the Minor Orders, viz., Porter, Lector, Exorcist, Acolyte (which includes the office of Eucharistic Minister), and to include also Sub-Deacon. The office of Deaconess, the office of Lay Chaplain, and a temporary lay reader’s license to lead Divine Offices are not of the clerical state and thus are not represented in the Council of Clergy, but rather in the Council of the Laity.
Sec. 2.    Retired clergy may participate as members of the Council of Clergy, but may not vote except by special permission of the appropriate Metropolitan or Bishop Ordinary.
Can. 40.   
Sec. 1.    Each Archdiocese shall meet in annual Metropolitan Court at a time and place specified by the Metropolitan. This meeting may be omitted or held more frequently by act of the Metropolitan for just cause. Similarly, each Diocese shall meet in annual Diocesan Court at a time and place specified by the Bishop Ordinary. This meeting may be omitted or held more frequently by act of the Ordinary for just cause.
Sec. 2.    Thirty (30) days notice, in writing should be given to all clergy who are to participate in the annual Metropolitan or Diocesan Court, as provided in the Canons. 
Sec. 3.    Special meetings of Metropolitan or Diocesan Court may be called by the Metropolitan or Ordinary.
Sec. 4.    The Pontifical Court meets in whole or in part as required by the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 41.     
Sec. 1.    Each Metropolitan See and Diocese shall maintain a Council of the Laity to ensure that the pastoral needs of the laity are met and to provide recommendations or opinions as needed to the local Curia, and to further serve the needs of the laity.
Sec. 2.    The Council of Laity shall include representatives of each parish and officially-sanctioned organizations. Members of the Council of the Laity shall be elected by a two-thirds (2/3) majority of the adult confirmed members of the parish or organization.
Sec. 3.    The number of representatives from each parish or organization shall be fixed by the Metropolitan for an Archdiocese or Ordinary for the Diocese.
Sec. 4.    The members of the Council may elected a President, Vice President, and Secretary by a simple majority, subject to the confirmation of the Metropolitan or Ordinary.
Sec. 5.    Meetings of the Council of the Laity may coincide with those of the Council of Clergy, and the President of the Council of the Laity may call special meetings as needed.
Can. 42.     The Code of Canon Law may be amended as needed by the Papa-Catholicos, provided such an amendment does not conflict with the other Canons of this Section. Only the Papa-Catholicos may amend the Canons, though others may recommend.
Can. 43.    Amendments to the Canons may not be made if they violate the Doctrine of the Imperial Roman Church, delivered unto the faithful in Sacred Scripture, through Ecumenical Council, or through the teaching authority of the Holy Church.
Can. 44.    Amendments to the Canons may not be used to make doctrinal changes that are only appropriate to be decided by Ecumenical Councils or by the teaching authority of the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 45.    It is the duty of a Bishop, and particularly of the Papa-Catholicos, to maintain and uphold doctrine and traditions of the Holy, Orthodox, Catholic, and Apostolic Church. Therefore, amendments are intended to alter operational procedures and policies in order to serve the faithful and establish the Kingdom of God on earth.

Selection and Appointment of Bishops, Abbots, and Abbesses

Can. 46.     To be eligible for election as Papa-Catholicos and Supreme Pontiff, in addition to other requirements as outlined in Canon Law, the nominee must be a priest in good standing, at least thirty (30) years of age, and ordinarily have five (5) years in the Priesthood, which two requirements may be waived in cases of need for the Apostolic See of Saints Mark and Stephen and the temporal Patrimony of St. Peter. The waiving of this requirement is at the sole discretion of the incumbent Papa-Catholicos if the election of his successor is to take place during his own lifetime, or else if not, then at the discretion of a majority of the Pontifical Electors.
Can. 47.    The requirements of eligibility as Coadjutor of the Apostolic See and the procedures for election are the same as for the Florentine-Roman Supreme Pontiff.
Can. 48.    If there is a Coadjutor for the Apostolic See, then he automatically succeeds to the office of Archfather upon the death, resignation, or retirement of the incumbent Papa-Catholicos, unless he is impeded by factors that render him ineligible to serve as Papa-Catholicos under Canon Law.
Can. 49.    Nominations of candidates for Papa-Catholicos may be made only by the Pontifical Electors. The electors elect a Chief Elector to preside and they themselves, under the authority of the Papa-Catholicos, establish procedures for carrying out the election. If no Pontifical Electors have been appointed at the time an election is required by necessity, then the entirety of the House of Bishops, the Pontifical Court, and the Patriarchal Curia serve as Electors for that one time only, with each such person having one vote. They likewise should elect a Chief Elector to preside and otherwise carry out the election as would be done by the Pontifical Electors.
Can. 50.     Capitular Bishops and Archbishops within the Apostolic See, as defined herein as members of the Patriarchal Chapter, may be appointed and consecrated by the Papa-Catholicos at his sole discretion. Said Bishops and Archbishops may hold offices as needed to assist in the ministry of the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 51.     
Sec. 1.    Bishops Ordinary may be elected by the entirety of the clergy of their diocese, including those in Minor Orders. The Laity do not participate in elections of Bishops. Alternatively, if the canons of the diocese do not permit for elections, an election cannot be held and the clergy of the diocese requests, or the Papa-Catholicos mandates, the Papa-Catholicos himself may appoint a Bishop Ordinary, as well as any Auxiliary Bishops deemed necessary.
Sec. 2.    A nominee for Bishop must be a priest in good standing, at least thirty (30) years of age, and must have five (5) years in the Priesthood, with a minimum of three (3) years experience as a rector of a congregation in the Imperial Roman Church, which two requirements may be waived in cases of need only by the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 3.    Procedures for election are established by each diocese in accordance with this Code of Particular Canon Law.
Sec. 4.    No cleric elected to serve as Bishop Ordinary or Suffragan (Auxiliary) Bishop may be consecrated without the Apostolic Mandate from the Archfather; neither may he be installed without permission of the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 52.   
Sec. 1.    The Archbishop of a Metropolitan See must be elected by the entirety of the clergy of their ecclesiastical province, i.e., their own archdiocese and all Suffragan dioceses, including those in Minor Orders. Alternatively, if the canons of the archdiocese do not permit for elections, an election cannot be held and the clergy of the archdiocese requests, or the Papa-Catholicos mandates, the Papa-Catholicos himself may appoint a Metropolitan, as well as any Auxiliary Bishops deemed necessary.
Sec. 2.    A nominee for Archbishop must be a priest in good standing, at least thirty (30) years of age, and must have five (5) years in the Priesthood with a minimum of three (3) years experience as a rector of a congregation in the Imperial Roman Church, which two requirements may be waived in cases of need only by the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 3.    It is typical that the Archbishop will have been a Bishop Ordinary or an Auxiliary Bishop, but this is not required.
Sec. 4.    Procedures for election are established by each archdiocese in accordance with this Code of Particular Canon Law.
Sec. 5.    No Archbishop Metropolitan shall be installed without the permission of the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 53.    Under no circumstances may the laity elect a Bishop or participate in the election of a Bishop as electors. The Laity here is defined as those not in at least tonsured clerics or in the Order of Porter and hence ineligible for membership in the Council of Clergy. 
Can. 54.    The laity of a particular jurisdiction may be consulted to seek advice and nominations for candidates for an episcopal office.
Can. 55.    No man shall be consecrated Bishop without an Apostolic Mandate. The Apostolic Mandate originates only from the Supreme Pontiff. A Bishop consecrating or being consecrated without the Apostolic Mandate shall incur latae sententiae excommunication, reserved to the Apostolic See of Saints Mark and Stephen.
Can. 56.    Abbots and Abbesses may be blessed by a jurisdictional Bishop without an Apostolic Mandate in accordance with the ceremonial rites in the appropriate Pontificale, provided they have been duly elected or appointed in accordance with the regulations of their Order and of Canon Law. This applies also to consecrated, mitred Abbots.
Can. 57.    Mitred Abbots may be granted the faculty of confirmation, but may not ordain to the Major Orders of Deacon and Priest, nor consecrate Bishops. However, they may ordain to the Minor Orders within their own communities.
Can. 58.    Bishops shall not serve as Rectors or in other parochial roles except as provided in Canon Law. 

Bishops as Pastoral Leaders

Can. 59.    The Papa-Catholicos may exercise the office of Rector of the Patriarchal Cathedral or Pro-Cathedral, of any Patriarchal Basilica, and of any mission church under the jurisdiction of the Imperial Roman Church.   
Can. 60.    All jurisdictional Bishops may exercise the authority of Rector of their Cathedral or Pro-Cathedral, or of mission churches under their authority.
Can. 61.    Suffragan Bishops may be appointed as Rectors of mission churches. They may serve as Rectors of parishes only with permission of their Ordinary or Metropolitan, and then only for just cause and true need of the parish.
Can. 62.    In all cases, including the Cathedral Parish, it is preferred that a Bishop not serve as Rector. In the case of a Cathedral Parish, even if the Bishop is officially the Rector, it is preferred that a priest be appointed as Dean of the Cathedral for purposes of administration of the parish and parish life.
Can. 63.    The role of a Bishop is not parochial. However, a Bishop, as Chief Pastor of his See, or a Suffragan Bishop sharing in the duties of the Chief Pastor, may exercise parochial duties when deemed necessary and advisable for the benefit of the faith and with the permission of the Papa-Catholicos.

The Liturgy of the Church

Can. 64.    The Supreme Pontiff is the chief liturgical officer of the Imperial Roman Church, across all Rites thereunto associated.
Can. 65.    The Metropolitan Archbishop is the chief liturgical officer of his Metropolitan See.
Can. 66.    The Bishop Ordinary is the chief liturgical officer of his Diocese.
Can. 67.    The liturgical practices of the Imperial Roman Church are guided by traditions of the universal church, as well as the various liturgical directives and books established under the authority of the Apostolic See. These may be across the entire Imperial Roman Church or specific to a particular Rite therein.
Can. 68.   
Sec. 1.    In addition to the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine, Anglo-Roman, and Gallo-Roman liturgy, other traditional Anglican, Roman , and Eastern Rite liturgy and liturgical supplements can be approved at the request of and for the specific use of a congregation with the approval of the Papa-Catholicos, or, if he so delegates, by the Prefecture of the Liturgy.
Sec. 2.    A Bishop Ordinary, a Metropolitan, or the Papa-Catholicos may mandate that certain additions or deletions be made to the form or rubrics of any liturgy used in order to ensure it conforms to Holy, Orthodox, Catholic, and Apostolic faith, doctrine, theology, and tradition. 
Sec. 3.    No liturgy may be used with the intent of denying any aspects of Catholic and Orthodox doctrine and faith, or the Catechism or Canon Law of the Imperial Roman Church. Use of any liturgy in such a context constitutes a disgrace to the liturgy and further is an abomination against the Church.
Can. 69.   
Sec. 1.    Specific liturgical practices mandated or suggested within the Imperial Roman Church are provided in Canon Law, the rubrics of the liturgical texts, and other directives by the Apostolic See.
Sec. 2.    Directives may not violate Canon Law, Church Doctrine, or Sacred Tradition.
Sec. 3.    Changes to the official liturgical practices affecting the entirety of the Church must be approved by the Papa-Catholicos or another official to whom this responsibility is designated. This also applies to major liturgical changes made by all Suffragan Sees that are beyond the scope of legitimate local usages within the authority of the local bishop.
Can. 70.    The standard for the Divine Liturgy, otherwise known at the Holy Mass or the Mass, shall be defined by the Prefecture of the Liturgy for each Rite, under the authority of the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 71.    Rubrics of the Missal for each specific Rite shall be followed. Where there are options, the Diocesan Bishop may mandate an option. Otherwise the choice of option is left to the celebrating or officiating priest.
Can. 72.    Within the bounds of Canon Law and Ceremonial Directives, the priest in charge of a parish may set forth rules and customs for celebration of Divine Liturgy in that parish.
Can. 73.    The Papa-Catholicos, a Metropolitan, or a Diocesan Bishop may mandate a certain form of the mass for specific occasions.
Can. 74.    When necessary due to circumstances, a priest may celebrate the Divine Liturgy alone. This is preferable to not celebrating the Divine Liturgy.
Can. 75.     All priests and parishes shall follow the Ordo Calendar as set forth by the Apostolic See of Saints Mark and Stephen. Variations may be approved by the Papa-Catholicos or, on a limited basis for pastoral reasons, by the Bishop Ordinary.
Can. 76.    Parishes may use the various forms of the Divine Liturgy (Mass) according to their Rite as given by the Prefecture of the Liturgy and through other ceremonial and liturgical directives.
Can. 77.   
Sec. 1.    In the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, a Low Mass shall be said by one priest, without other sacred ministers, and one or two servers. In the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite (and also the Anglican-Byzantine Rite, to which apply all that applies to the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite except where noted), there is no distinction known as Low Mass, but rather there is specifically only one form of the liturgy -- with specific modifications in the liturgy celebrated in its non-solemn form are given in the rubrics of the said liturgy.
Sec. 2.    A confirmed lay man who holds a temporary Lay Reader license or a man who is ordained to any of the Minor Orders may serve as Sub-Deacon when there are insufficient clerics to provide a Sub-Deacon. It is preferred that this Minister be, however, ordained as a Sub-Deacon or ordained to the Major Orders.
Can. 78.    In the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, a Sung Mass (Missa Cantata) shall follow the form of a High Mass, but without all of the three sacred ministers. There may be a Celebrant alone, or there may be a Celebrant or Deacon. The Sub-Deacon is not present. Various ceremonial aspects of the High Mass may be omitted as needed or according to local usage. This distinction does not exist in the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, and specific forms of celebrating the liturgy are given in the rubrics of that liturgy.
Can. 79.   
Sec. 1.   The norms of the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Litury are given in the rubrics of that liturgy. Likewise, the norms of all liturgy not specifically mentioned herein, as well as all liturgical issues not specifically mentioned herein, shall be provided in the rubrics of that liturgy or other ceremonial directive. 
Can. 80.    Pontifical forms of the liturgy of each rite shall be given in ceremonial directives or the rubrics.
Can. 81.    Concelebration is only permitted at the consecration of a Bishop or the blessing of an Abbot who is a priest, or by pro hac vice permission of the Metropolitan of the ecclesiastical province, or the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 82.     The liturgy of a particular Rite may only be celebrated by a priest appointed to that Rite by the Papa-Catholicos, Metropolitan, or Bishop Ordinary. 
Sec. 1. Priests may be appointed to more than one Rite, but should be thoroughly trained in each Rite before such an appointment. 
Sec. 2. The Papa-Catholicos uses only the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite or the Anglican-Byzantine Rite when celebrating the liturgy, that being the Rite pertaining to his principal title as Catholicos.
Sec. 3. The vesture of the Papa-Catholicos is always according to the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite.
Sec. 4. The Papa-Catholicos, if presiding at liturgy other than the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine or Anglican Byzantine Rites, nevertheless, by Sec. 3, uses the vesture of the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite.
Can. 83.    Due reverence shall be exhibited by all persons in the liturgy and within sacred spaces. 
Sec. 1. No person shall enter the sanctuary of the church, being defined as the area within the chancel rail or inside an iconostatis, according to the specific construction of a particular church, unless a cleric and furthermore without some specific sacred purpose. Laymen may enter the said area with permission and with a specific sacred purpose. Lay women, as needed, may enter the said area with permission and with a specific sacred purpose.
Sec. 2. Consecrated elements shall be handled and, in the case of reserved hosts, reserved in accordance at all times with the rubrics.
Sec. 3.    Linens shall be handled and cleaned in accordance with rubrics.
Sec. 4.    Altar linens must be hand washed by a priest three times before they may be otherwise laundered.
Sec. 5.    Washings of linens and sacred vessels must be disposed of on suitable bare earth, either directly or through a sacrarium, the pipes of which shall pass directly to suitable bare earth.
Sec. 6.    A chalice veil is required at the Holy Mass in all cases.  
Can. 84.    When a vestment is called for in the rubrics, the gold or white version of that vestment may be used on a day that the color is white, red, blue, or green, and a purple vestment may be used when the color is purple, rose, or black.
Can. 85.    In the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, the maniple is required by the Celebrant, Deacon, and Sub-Deacon. Its use in those Rites may not be waived by local use. The maniple is not, however, customary or used in the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite.
Can. 86.    The Divine Liturgy of all Rites shall not be celebrated in the style of versus populum, but rather shall be celebrated in the style ad orientem.
Can. 87.     In each Rite, the vesture of the clergy is provided in the rubrics of the liturgy of that Rite.
Can. 88.    A bishop in liturgical dress shall wear the choral form of the cassock. 
Can. 89.    Headwear in accordance with the rubrics of a specific Rite shall be worn at the Divine Liturgy (Mass).
Can. 90.    Religious priests wear their habit in place of the cassock. Bishops and Prelates in religious orders may instead by custom wear the prelatial cassock in the colour of their religious habit.

Clerical Vesture

Can. 91.    Outside the liturgy and administration of the sacraments, the biretta, skufia, or kamilavka may be worn with house dress, particularly at formal or solemn non-liturgical occasions. It may be worn with academic dress in lieu of the mortarboard or tam. It may be worn while entering and exiting the church. Wherever "biretta" is mentioned, a skufia or kamilavka may likewise be used.
Sec. 1.    The biretta of a Priest or Deacon is black. The biretta of a Bishop is Roman purple.
Sec. 2.    The biretta of a Canon, Dean ad Honorem, or the First Archdeacon of the Patriarchal Chapter is royal blue; and a royal blue zucchetto is used.
Sec. 3.    The biretta of a Canon, Dean, or First Archdeacon of Suffragan Sees may have optional Roman purple trim and tuft.
Sec. 4.    In place of the biretta, all clergy may wear the skufia in Russian or Greek style, in proper colour equivalent to that used for the biretta.
Sec. 5    The biretta shall have three wings, except for the academic biretta of a Doctor, which may optionally have four wings. The doctoral biretta is not worn by Bishops. The biretta of clergy of the Pontifical Order of the Eagle also has four wings, is red, and is worn by all clerics of that order who are not cardinals.   
Sec. 6. The academic biretta, which may only be worn at academic functions, may have a tuft and trim in the academic color of the highest degree held.   
Can. 92.   In the Gallo-Roman and Anglo-Roman Rites, the zucchetto is worn by Bishops during the mass, but is removed before the Dominus vobiscum immediately preceding the Sursam Corda, and is not replaced until after the ablutions. In the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, it is removed before the Preface and replaced after the ablutions.   In the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, the zucchetto is worn by all clerics throughout the liturgy, except during the consecration, when so noted in the rubrics.
Can. 93. The zucchetto is removed by all who are wearing it at any time the Blessed Sacrament is exposed on the altar. The zucchetto is not worn during a procession involving the exposed Blessed Sacrament.    
Can. 94.  All Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Sub-Deacons, and Minor Clerics may wear the zucchetto outside the liturgy, regardless of Rite. This includes Divine Offices and other prayer or liturgical functions, except those involving the exposed Blessed Sacrament.
Can. 95.   The colour of the zucchetto is given in this canon: 
Sec. 1.    The zucchetto for Clerics in general is black.
Sec. 2.    The zucchetto for Bishops is Roman purple.
Sec. 3.    The zucchetti of Canons and Deans of the Patriarchal Chapter, and of the First Archdeacon is royal blue.
Sec. 4.    The zucchetti of Canons, Deans, and Archdeacons in suffragan Sees are black and optionally with Roman Purple trim.
Sec. 5.    The zucchetto of Cardinals is scarlet watered silk.
Sec. 6.    The zuchetto of Electoral bishops is red.
Sec. 7.    The zucchetto of the Papa-Catholicos is white watered silk.
Sec. 8.    The zucchetti of religious orders with white habits may be white if so designated in the rule of the particular order.
Can. 96.  A bishop of the Gallo-Roman or Anglo-Roman Rite celebrating Low Mass is recommended to wear the purple biretta, but is not required to do so. The mitre is not worn in those Rites at Low Mass unless ordination or confirmation is conferred, and then it shall not be the Precious Mitre. 
Can. 97.   Clergy of the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites below the rank of Bishop do not wear the zucchetto during the mass, either in choir or when serving as a Sacred Minister or other assistant. However, those of the  Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite do wear the zucchetto during the Divine Liturgy, as specified in the rubrics of that Rite.
Can. 98.    In the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, the pallium is worn by a Metropolitan Archbishop or other of the episcopal state to whom the right to the pallium has been conferred over the chasuble at Sung Mass and High Mass, as well as at Low Mass if the mitre is worn. The pallium is only worn within the jurisdiction of the Archbishop, i.e., within their own Archdiocese and within any diocese within their ecclesiastical province. The Archfather wears the pallium at all churches.     
Can. 99.     In the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, the pallium is worn by all Archbishops with full pontifical liturgical dress always and in all locations.
Can. 100.     The Divine Liturgy (Holy Mas) and other liturgy shall not be celebrated in any other vesture other than that detailed in Canon Law, the rubrics, and Ceremonial Directives.
Can. 101.     No visible jewelry may be worn during mass, other than a tasteful timepiece and, for Bishop, the episcopal ring; and other jewelry as approved by Episcopal authority.
Can. 102.    Married priests may wear simple wedding rings. It may be worn on either the left or right hand.  Priests of any Rite who are not married may also wear a simple wedding ring as a symbol of their marriage to the Church.  
Can. 103.   Shoes and socks for priests and deacons shall be black. This shall apply also to clergy in choir, whether at mass or not.  
Can. 104.    Shoes for Bishops at liturgy, whether in sacred vestments or choir dress, may be black, Roman purple, or dark red; socks should be Roman purple. The Papa-Catholicos, Cardinals, and Electoral Bishops may wear scarlet shoes.  
Can. 105.   For Pontifical High Mass (or sung mass), in the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, Episcopal sandals and buskins in appropriate liturgical color may be used by Bishops serving as Celebrant, Deacon, or Sub-Deacon, except at Masses for the Dead and Good Friday.  The use of sandals and buskins is a matter of individual choice for the Bishop and is not required. The black, purple, or dark red slippers are considered to constitute suitably dignified footwear for the Bishop at mass. In the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, the episcopal sandals and buskins are not used.
Can. 106.    In the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, Pontifical Liturgical gloves should be worn by Bishops in mass vestments during Pontifical High Mass and may be worn during Pontifical Sung Mass. The color of the liturgical gloves is the color of the day. The back of the hand of the glove should be decorated with a cross or other suitable emblem. The opening should be decorated with gold braid or other suitable decoration. They need not have gauntlets.  Gloves are not worn with liturgical vestments during the Divine Liturgy of the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite; however, they may be worn with pontifical dress, even during liturgy, and for processions. Liturgical gloves are not worn by any Rite at masses of the dead, or on Good Friday.    
Can. 107.  At a Pontifical High Mass or Pontifical Missa Cantata, in the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, the wearing of the dalmatic under the chasuble is required. It must be in a color suitable to the day. The dalmatic must either match the chasuble in color or follow the schema of substitution, viz., if the chasuble is gold, white, green, red, or Marian blue, the dalmatic may be gold or white; if the chasuble is silver, then the dalmatic may be silver or white; if the chasuble is rose or black, the chasuble may be purple.
Dalmatics in black, rose, or Marian blue may only be worn with chasubles of matching color.    
Can. 108.     Specific vestment usage not contained within the Code of Canon Law or Ceremonial Directives is outlined in the rubrics for mass approved by the Apostolic See in accordance with Sacred Tradition. Variations are not permitted except where allowance is made in Canon Law or Ceremonial Directives for local use, or with express permission of the Papa-Catholicos, or where not inconsistent with higher directives, by a Metropolitan or Bishop Ordinary.  
Can. 109.   Bishops and prelates of religious orders wear the choir habit in the colour of their order. The cappa magna, however, may be either in the colours of their order or in its general form, i.e., purple.  Also, the zucchetto and biretta for bishops in religious orders are always purple (red for an electoral bishop, red watered silk for a cardinal) and, unless the customary use of the order dictates otherwise, the fascia is also purple. House dress for Bishops and prelates of religious orders may be the usual episcopal habit or prelatial habit in the colour of the religious order, or else they use the regular episcopal or prelatial habit of secular Bishops and prelates if customary for their order.
Can. 110.    Clergy sitting in choir shall vest in choir dress at liturgy. For all Rites, for Deacons and Priests, as well as those in minor orders, choir dress shall consist of a black cassock and white surplice. Those entitled to the rochet and another specific choral cassock use that instead. Those in religious orders use their habit instead of the cassock, except for prelates entitled to the prelatial habit.
Can. 111.    Clergy of any Rite may wear the black cappa choralis over choir dress when seated in choir. The cape is plain black with a black collar, with or without shoulder cape, no trim, and is closed at the neck with either black ribbons or black tasseled cords.
Can. 112.
Sec. 1.    The standard vesture for Bishops in Choir is the Roman purple mozzetta (jurisdictional bishops within their jurisdiction) or mantelletta (jurisdictional bishops outside their jurisdiction and all other bishops), all with Roman purple or red lining, with Roman rochet; or, alternatively only for the bishops of the Anglo-Roman Rite, the red chimere with Anglican rochet; both being worn over a Roman purple cassock. The trim and buttons on the cassock and mozzetta may be either Roman purple or red.
Sec. 2.    The purple zucchetto is worn. It is removed at the appropriate part of the mass, even by clergy in choir.
Sec. 3.    The purple biretta is worn by Bishops in choir dress in the same manner as priests.
Sec. 4.    For the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, the pectoral cross may be on a chain or cord in green and gold. For the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, the engolpion is worn, and always on a chain.
Sec. 5.    For the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, the crosier is not carried when in choir dress, except as provided in the rubrics. For the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, the crosier or the short staff may be carried in choir dress as appropriate to the usage.
Sec. 6.    For the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, for particularly solemn occasions, Bishops in choir may wear, in place of the mozzetta, mantelletta, or chimere, a cope of appropriate color and the mitre. This may be worn over either style of rochet or an alb. The stole in appropriate color is worn except where otherwise noted in the rubrics. For the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, the usage is the same, but as specifically defined in the rubrics for that Rite. The use of the cope and mitre is particularly appropriate for officiating from the throne or faldstool and the administration of sacraments. At other solemn occasions, the cappa magna is generally more appropriate for a jurisdictional Bishop in his diocese or the senior Suffragan present. Also, the cappa magna may be worn by a jurisdictional Bishop in his diocese or the senior Suffragan present at times when the cope and mitre would be worn, except as provided otherwise in the rubrics, Canon Law, or ceremonial directives.
Sec. 7.    By Anglo-Roman bishops only, the tippet may be worn with the chimere but never with the mozzetta or mantelletta.
Sec. 8.    Over the mozzetta may be worn by jurisdictional Bishops, within their jurisdiction, the gold and white episcopal stole, which shall instead be purple or purple and gold within penitential seasons.
Sec. 9.    Bishops of any Rite may wear the episcopal cape, or cappa pontificalis, over choir dress when sitting in choir or when presiding at a mass which they are not celebrating and not vested in cope and mitre or cappa magna. This cape is Roman purple; may be ground length, but should not have a train; has Roman purple or red lining, a Roman purple or red velvet or matching fabric collar, no trimming, and a Roman purple or red tasseled cord or ribbon tie. It also has a small shoulder cape over it.
Sec. 10.    When presiding in choir dress from the throne or faldstool, or when processing, or at other solemn occasions as appropriate, the cappa magna may be worn. It is worn only by bishops within their jurisdiction or by the senior bishop presiding at liturgy or an event. When seated on the throne in choir dress but not cope and mitre, the cappa magna, mozzetta, or chimere (according to Rite) may be used. If vested in mozzetta or chimere, the Bishop presiding may alternatively occupy the first stall in the choir. The cappa magna itself shall be of silk or wool. During the winter half-year, i.e., from First Vespers of the Feast of Saint Catherine (November 25) through First Vespers of the Feast of the Ascension exclusive, the winter cappa magna is worn. The hood of the winter cappa magna is lined in white fur and may have black ermine tips. During the summer half-year, i.e., from First Vespers of the Feast of the Ascension through First Vespers of the Feast of Saint Catherine exclusive, the hood of the cappa magna is to be of dark red silk (scarlet for cardinals and electoral bishops).
Sec. 11.    The mantelletta is worn in place of the mozzetta by non-jurisdictional Bishops and by jurisdictional Bishops outside of their jurisdictions. In the case of an Ordinary within his diocese, in the presence of his Metropolitan or the Papa-Catholicos, or a Metropolitan within his province, but in the presence of the Papa-Catholicos, the mozzetta is worn over the mantelletta. At a provincial synod, however, the Ordinaries participating in the synod use only the mozzetta. 
Sec. 12.    The mantelletta alone is worn by all Bishops within the territorial patrimony of the Apostolic See, except that the mozzetta is worn over the mantelletta in all areas by the Archbishop or Cardinal Coadjutor of the Apostolic See. Within the patrimony of the Apostolic See, cardinals also use both the mozzetta and mantelletta, unless in their titular church or if the office of Papa-Catholicos is vacant, in which two cases only the mozzetta is used.
Sec. 13.    The Vicar-General of the Apostolic See uses the mantelletta alone within the territorial patrimony of the Apostolic See or within the presence of the Papa-Catholicos, but the mozzetta over the mantelletta in all other areas.
Sec. 14.    Bishops who are non-territorial jurisdictional Bishops use the mozzetta in the same manner as a Bishop Ordinary.
Sec. 15.    An Auxiliary Bishop appointed as an Episcopal Visitor uses the mantelletta and never the mozzetta.
Sec. 16.    The use of the mantelletta as described in Canon Law and other directives for choir dress applies also to court dress.     
Can. 113.  If a priest or deacon in choir is to assist in the distribution of communion, then if of the Anglo-Roman Rite, he must not wear the tippet, but, in all Rites must wear a stole in the color of the day. However, he only takes the stole at the time at which he is to assist in the distribution of Holy Communion. Clerics in minor orders do not wear the stole to assist with the distribution of Holy Communion.  
Can. 114.  If a Bishop in choir is to assist in distribution of Holy Communion, then, regardless of Rite, a stole in the liturgical colour may be placed over the mozzetta, mantelletta, or chimere. If a jurisdictional bishop within his jurisdiction, the pastoral stole may instead be used and worn throughout the liturgy.
Can. 115. Choir dress of Canons and Chamberlains of the Apostolic See (members of the Patriarchal Chapter and Pontifical Court) consists of a Roman purple cassock, Roman purple fascia, rochet, Roman purple mantelletta (for Canons), Roman purple mantellone (for Chamberlains) and royal blue biretta and zucchetto (Canons and Deans), or in black (Chamberlains). For the First Archdeacon, tthe habit is instead red, but with the royal blue zucchetto and biretta. The Canons, Deans ad Honorem, and the First Archdeacon are also entitled to the cappa magna (red for the First Archdeacon, purple otherwise) in the same style as for an auxiliary bishop, but always worn with the train curtailed or carried over the left arm. However, the choir cassock of other members of the Patriarchal Curia who have been granted by the Papa-Catholicos the right to use, ex officio, the style of Monsignor, is black with red trim and red buttons, their fascia and biretta being in black with optional red tuff and trim.       
Can. 116.   Additional elements of vesture of the Pontifical Court and Curia are defined in policy approved by the Papa-Catholicos.  
Can. 117.   In all Suffragan Sees of the Imperial Roman Church, the choir dress of diocesan and Metropolitan Prelates ex officio shall be a black cassock with Roman purple trim and buttons, purple fascia, and black biretta with optional Roman purple tuft and trimming. This is applicable to those members of the diocesan or Metropolitan Curiae who have specifically been granted the style, ex officio, of Monsignor by their respective Ordinary or Metropolitan. Prelates of Diocesan and Metropolitan Chapters may make use of appropriate Chapter dress, following Canon Law, ceremonial directives, and local use. The cappa magna with a train and other forms of capitular dress are not permitted for members of Chapters of suffragan Sees unless approved by the Papa-Catholicos.  
Can. 118.      When present in the Patriarchal Cathedral or other Patriarchal Basilica, when in the Pontifical Court or Patriarchal Curia, when officially representing the Papa-Catholicos, when appearing publically as a corporate body, or any other authorized time, the members of the Patriarchal Chapter wear their Chapter Dress.
Can. 119.     The Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter of the rank of Canon Sub-Deacon may use the plain simplex mitre according to their Rite. This applies at all liturgy at which the biretta would normally be worn according to liturgical norms. 
Can. 120.    The trains of the cappa magna may be worn down in the prelate's own jurisdiction. Only Cardinals, the Governor-General, and the Arch-Chancellor may wear the train down in the presence of the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 121.    Priests of the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite are entitled to a silver cross, without jewels, which may be worn with both regular and liturgical dress. 
Can. 122.     The Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter are also entitled to a gold pectoral cross in choir and mass vestments, as well as with the regular habit, pendant from a cord of gold and blue (Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, only with choir and liturgical vesture) or chain (Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, as well as all Rites for regular dress).  
Can. 123.    When vested solemnly for a solemn Papal Divine Liturgy, members of the Patriarchal Chapter who are not the Deacon or Sub-Deacon of the mass or in another role with specific vesture vest as follows:
     All: Choir cassock and rochet, without stole (or maniple, for the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites)
     Dean, Electoral Bishops, Titular Archbishops, Titular Bishops, and Crown Cardinals: Cope, mitre, either golden if the Archfather wears the jeweled mitre, or simplex otherwise, according to their Rite.
     First Archdeacon and Deans ad Honorem: Cope, simplex mitre (if the First Archdeacon is a bishop, then the mitre as given above for bishops); and for the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, the vestment, whether cope, dalmatic, or tunicle, is according to their level of ordination.
     Canon Priests: chasuble (Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite: Cope), simplex mitre
     Canon Deacons: Dalmatic, simplex mitre
     Canon Sub-Deacons: Tunicle, simplex mitre
     Canon Clerics: Cappa magna (with train worn up), biretta 
Can. 124.     Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter who are not bishops, if they be sub-deacons or above in holy orders, may wear the simplex mitre according to their Rite, pontifical gloves (without crosses, if not a bishop) in the usual manner according to the rubrics of their Rite, pontifical slippers (either plain episcopal sandals in liturgical colour with buskins or else slippers in dark red or roman purple), and the pectoral cross at the Divine Liturgy when vested in liturgical vestments. In the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, the pontifical dalmatic is not worn by those not bishops. In the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite, the Canons vest according to their level of ordination according to the rubrics of that Rite.
Can. 125.    Prelates of the Patriarchal Chapter who are not bishops vest in the sacristy and not at the altar or in a chapel.
Can. 126.    The Deans ad Honorem and First Archdeacon of the Apostolic See may wear purple socks in house dress, Chapter Dress, and choir dress. Socks of other prelates are black. 
Can. 127.     Members of the various Cathedral and Diocesan Chapters of the Suffragan Sees may adopt their own Chapter Dress, in accordance with tradition and custom, with concurrence of the Papa-Catholicos. This dress is worn only at their respective cathedral or when appearing as a corporate body. 
Can. 128.      When attending mass or other liturgy, all members of the clergy shall wear appropriate clerical dress as defined by Canon Law and Ceremonial Directives.
Can. 129.   
Sec. 1.    The most proper form of dress for attending the divine liturgy is choir dress. This shall be worn unless the exceptions provided herein apply.
Sec. 2.    House dress may be worn when attending the divine liturgy and sitting out of choir. This is particularly intended for clerics who are travelling or have other special circumstances.
Sec. 3.    Choir dress shall be worn by clergy who are processing and/or sitting on the clergy side of the roodscreen and/or sitting in an officially designated clergy choir area (even if located within the nave, in the pews normally used by the laity, etc.) and/or participating in any way in the liturgy, including but not limited to assistance with distribution of Communion, serving at the altar, and reading.
Sec. 4.    The use of civic dress, abito corto, or the uniforms of the Stato Pontificio and its official organisations may be used at the liturgy as appropriate with permission, except when sitting in choro. 
Can. 130. The clergy shall wear choir dress at other significant acts of public prayer outside the mass. Else, house dress should be worn.   
Can. 131.  Either Choir Dress or House Dress (to include the cassock or habit of a religious order) may be worn at the Divine Offices other than Matins, Lauds, and Vespers, as well as certain public prayer services at the discretion of the cleric in charge or by Episcopal directive.  
Can. 132.     
Sec. 1.    Choir dress must be worn for Matins, Lauds, and Vespers, except those offices recited privately in residence.
Sec. 2.    The officiant should wear a stole in the appropriate color of the day, unless a bishop in cappa magna, mozzetta, mantelletta, or chimere (in which case a jurisdictional bishop in his own jurisdiction may wear the pastoral stole as designated in canon law.) For Solemn services, the cope may be used. At solemn Matins and Lauds, the bishop most formally wears the cappa magna until the psalter of Lauds and then changes into cope and mitre. Likewise at solemn vespers,  the bishop most formally wears the cappa magna until the psalter and then changes into cope and mitre.
Sec. 3.    A Bishop assisting at solemn Matins, Lauds, or Vespers may also wear the cappa magna if not officiating but presiding. In this case, he typically sits on the throne or faldstool, not in the choir. If he officiates at Solemn Matins, Lauds, or Vespers, then he wears the cope and mitre according to his Rite. However, if he officiates or presides at non-solemn Matins, Lauds, or Vespers, he may wear the cappa magna and sit on the throne or faldstool, or he may wear the mozzetta and sit in the first stall of the choir, the throne, or the faldstool.
Sec. 4.    The Bishop presiding at an event outside the liturgy, that is, not the Holy Mass or the Divine Offices, may wear the cappa magna or the mozzetta and/or mantelletta at acts of public prayer and other acts of importance or that are ceremonial in nature and at other similar times when deemed appropriate. When the jurisdictional Bishop is present, he is deemed automatically to be presiding. In the event that a Bishop Ordinary and/or his Metropolitan and/or the Archfather are present, the senior official present is deemed to be presiding. However, all jurisdictional Bishops within their jurisdiction may wear the cappa magna at appropriate occasions. The Bishops of the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite may alternatively wear pontifical dress or regular or simplex liturgical dress according to the rubrics of that Rite. Regardless of Rite, the regular or choir cassock may be worn with the clerical toga at such events as appropriate.
Sec. 5.    The cappa magna is worn while standing with the front raised up and carried over the arms. The front may be released to cover the entire body only when kneeling or sitting, or, at the discretion of the prelate, while walking at times when the hood is worn up over the head.
Sec. 6.    The hood of the cappa magna is worn up over the head only during Matins or at penitential rites, including all major offices of Ash Wednesday, solemn arrival to the mass of Ash Wednesday, the Divine Offices of the Dead, solemn arrival to requiem masses and other masses of the dead, and the Tenebrae Offices of the Sacred Triduum, as well as at all instances of solemn arrival to liturgy during the Triduum, except the Mass of the Institution of the Lord’s Supper. Thus, because the Papa-Catholicos wears the cappa magna only at the solemn Divine Offices of Christmas and Ash Wednesday, and as well during the solemn arrival a liturgy of the dead and penitential liturgy, he always wears the cappa magna with the hood over the head.
Sec. 7.    Watered silk shall be used only by the Papa-Catholicos, Cardinals, the Coadjutor, and Capitular Archbishops of the Apostolic See (but not Electoral Bishops). Said Archbishops may optionally have the cappa magna, ferraiolo, clerical toga, zucchetto, silk biretta, and both the house and choir fascia made of watered silk.
Sec. 8.    The choir fascia of all Bishops may terminate in a Roman purple or dark red tassel or else matching fringe. 
Can. 133.    The vesture of members of religious orders at all Divine Offices is defined by the specific Order.
Can. 134.     Priests and Deacons may wear the black cappa choralis over house dress or choir dress during the Daily Offices, even when officiating. Bishops may wear the purple cappa pontificalis over choir dress or house dress during the Daily Offices, even when officiating, except when wearing the cappa magna.
Can. 135.     Choir dress or house dress is expected to be worn while hearing confession or administering any other sacrament for which mass vestments are not being worn. It is the ideal for visitation of the sick, but house dress may be worn instead as needed. In case of just cause and urgent needs, both confession and visitation of the sick may be administered in civic dress or any attire, in which case if possible a stole should nevertheless be used.
Can. 136.        
Sec. 1.    House (Regular) Dress for clerics of all Rites consists of a black cassock, with or without black cincture (band fascia or rope). The black biretta (and therefore also the skufia or kamilavka) may be used, indoors or outdoors, by those of the level of Sub-Deacon and above. The saturno, black, with or without black cords and tassels, as well as a suitable black clerical hat (including a fedora or similar hat), may be used by all ranks of clergy. Likewise the black zucchetto may be used by all ranks of clergy. The cassock shall be worn with a regular collar of the Apostolic See of Sts. Stephen and Mark or else the Roman collar or similar collar, or the collar of a particular religious order. Shoes shall customarily be black with black stockings. A detachable or integral black shoulder cape may be worn by priests. A black clerical toga or ferraiolo may be worn.
Sec. 2.    House (Regular) Dress of Prelates is the same as for priests, except that the cassock is black with red or Roman purple trim and buttons according to their state, and the fascia is Roman purple. The toga or ferraiolo, black for deacons, priests, and prelates below the rank of Bishop, may be worn and is particularly encouraged for formal occasions. The toga or ferraiolo may be required by ecclesiastical authority. Dress gloves for clergy in house dress are black silk or similar material.
Sec. 3.    House (Regular) Dress for Bishops consists of a black cassock with red trim and buttons and Roman purple fascia. It may have oversleeves and/or an attached or detachable shoulder cape. The cassock and the shoulder cape may be lined in purple. The pectoral cross (or engolpion for the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite) on a chain is used. The purple biretta, skufia, or kamilavka may be worn. The saturno, with green or green and gold cords and tassels, as well as a suitable black clerical hat, may be used. A green saturno with gold embellishment may also be used. The shoes shall be black or cordovan, and stockings shall be black or Roman purple. The toga or ferraiolo, purple for Bishops, red for Electoral Bishops and Cardinals, may be worn. Its use is particularly encouraged on formal occasions. Only for outdoor use may be used the tabarro/cloak, in black or purple for bishops, black or red for electoral bishops and cardinals. Formal gloves for Bishops are Roman purple or dark red silk or similar material, with the episcopal ring worn over the glove. Gloves for electoral bishops and cardinals are scarlet.
Sec. 4.  Court Dress consists of the same cassock used with choir dress, as well as the mozzetta or mantelletta (or other garment as specified) according to rank, worn without the rochet. For clergy who are not prelates, either the cassock is used with the ferraiolo or toga, or the cassock and surplice may be used. For prelates, Alternative Court Dress consists of the house cassock with the toga or ferraiolo.
Can. 137.    House (regular) dress shall be the standard dress for clergy, particularly when attending meetings, teaching courses, addressing a congregation, and the like. When it is not practical to wear house dress, abito corto (private habit) or civic dress may be worn.
Can. 138.   
Sec. 1.    All clerics, regardless of rank, are expected to be dressed in attire appropriate to the clerical state, as defined in canon law, ceremonial directives, and other decrees and instructions, at all times when they are in public, whether at an explicitly religious function or location or not.  This same usage is expected to be retained in general in private settings as well.
Sec. 2.    Clergy of all ranks are in a state of life that comes with it certain duties and responsibilities. They are at all times representatives of Christ and his Holy Church.
Sec. 3.    Exceptions to the requirement of clerical dress include participation in athletics, when wear of clerical attire presents a clear and present danger to the physical person of the cleric, and other times as permitted for just cause by lawful ecclesiastical authority. in such cases the cleric is still expected to dress in a manner befitting the clerical state.
Sec. 4.    When not vested in the cassock, private habit, or civic habit as defined within Canon Law and the clerical norms of the Apostolic See, clergy may, with approval of episcopal authority, and in accordance with ancient traditions of the Church, make use of conservative gentleman’s attire, with proper modifications. 
a.    Gentleman’s attire may be worn, even in public, with permission of the immediate jurisdictional Bishop, subject to the conditions here given. That habit is known as the cleric’s “Private Civic Habit.”
b.    This gentleman’s attire must be conservative in nature, relatively austere, and not given towards modern whimsical fashion, but classic in style. Bishops may continue to wear the pontifical insignia, viz., the episcopal ring and, if practical, the pectoral cross or engolpion. The zucchetto is particularly appropriate and traditional to be worn by all ranks of clergy.
c.    The wear of gentleman’s attire is prohibited if it is for reasons contrary to law, directives, and doctrine. It may likewise not be worn as an accommodation to a prohibition to the wear of clerical attire by outside entities. If a cleric is told not to wear clerical attire by any other ecclesistical or secular authority other that the Apostolic See of Sts. Stephen and Mark, he is obligated by this canon to wear the cassock, abito corto, or civic habit. 
d.    Clerical clothing must be worn at all times when interacting with secular governments, except for routine business such as the renewal of a license. The norms are established by Pontifical directives.
e.    Clerical clothing must be worn at all times when interacting with ecclesiastical governments and their representatives. The norms are established by Pontifical directives.
f.    The provisions of the dispensations contained herein do not state or imply that clerical attire is not the normal attire of a cleric; and neither do they state or imply that the standard attire of a cleric is not the clerical cassock or the ordinary habit (abito corto). This dispensation does not modify the letter or spirit of any law of the Church. Rather, this dispensation applies an ancient custom of the Church, i.e., the wear of gentleman’s attire as street dress with proper ecclesiastical modifications. That is, the cleric so attired, if in accordance with Canon Law and the norms and directives of the Church, is properly attired as a cleric.
g.    The provisions of this decree are subject to modification, including revocation of dispensation, at any time by the Archfather and a lower jurisdictional bishop if deemed necessary for the good of the Faith. Such a modification or revocation may be permanent or temporary, and may apply universally or to specific, individual clerics. Prelates in jurisdiction are cautioned to ensure that the provisions of this dispensation are not allowed to be abused. 
Can. 139.     
Sec. 1.    The Private Habit (abito corto) for clergy consists of a black frock coat with high collar, worn closed or open, black trousers, with waistcoat, shirt with regular or other suitable collar,  black shoes, and black stockings. The jacket must be of length just above the knees. The trousers may be full length or knee breeches, the latter being worn with knee stockings.
Sec. 2.    Bishops wear the pectoral cross or engolpion on a chain, according to Rite, as well as the episcopal ring.
Sec. 3.    Bishops may also use the black vest with red buttons and piping. The vest of other prelates may have purple buttons and piping. 
Sec. 4.    With ordinary habit, bishops and others so entitled must wear purple prelatial stockings, and cardinals may use scarlet stockings.
Sec. 7.    The zucchetto is considered a proper part of this habit.
Sec. 8.    The saturno or other suitable dress hat may be wor.
Can. 140.     
Sec. 1.    Clergy are expected to wear clerical attire at academic ceremonies.
Sec. 2.    Academic dress for clergy through the rank of priest with bachelor or master degrees is formal house dress as described above.
Sec. 3.    Those holding doctoral degrees from the seminary of the Apostolic See may make use of that regalia.
Sec. 4.    The academic hood may be worn. For Bishops or Cardinals wearing the mozzetta, they may wear the academic hood only if the mozzetta does not have a vestigial hood or if they are not wearing the toga, ferraiolo, or cappa magna. Also, members of religious orders that have as part of their habit a hood do not wear an academic hood.
Sec. 5.    The regular biretta, skufia, or kamilavka should be worn. Clerics through the ranks of priest with a doctoral degree may wear the appropriate doctoral gown over the cassock. The doctoral biretta may be worn, or the regular biretta, or the black doctoral tam.
Sec. 6.    Clerical dress gloves may be worn according to rank.
Sec. 7.    For Prelates, the standards set in this Canon apply, except that equivalent prelatial dress is worn. For Bishops and Caridnals, the episcopal choral habit should be worn. House dress, however, may be worn, with the clerical toga or ferraiolo. The biretta is worn, noting that Bishops and Cardinals do not wear a doctoral biretta.
Can. 141.     
Sec. 1.    The habit of the Papa-Catholicos consists of a white cassock with white or red buttons and white or red trimming. The zucchetto is of plain white watered silk. The mozzetta is red cloth or velvet with white fur trim during the winter half-year until the Vigil of Easter; of white damask with fur trim from easter vigil through the Vigil of Pentecost exclusive; and of red watered silk during the summer half-year. The summer variant is also used on occasions of penance and for rites of the dead. 
Sec. 2.    The falda, when used, is white, of several inches beyond floor length in the front and a further one metre train in the back. Three train bearers, one behind for the train and two on either side to hold the front, may be used.
Sec. 3.    The biretta is never used by the Papa-Catholicos. Instead a camauro in white, and with optional fur trim during the winter half year, may be worn. When the red velvet mozzetta is worn, a matching camauro in red velvet with white fur trim may be used.
Sec. 4.    The choir fascia is white watered silk with gold or red and gold tassels. The same fascia may be used with house dress, or else a plain white fascia with white fringe.
Sec. 5.    The stockings are white.
Sec. 6.    The tabarro is red. The ferraiolo is never used, but the toga, in red with two small green facings on either side of the front is used for the public habit.
Sec. 7.    The private habit (abito corto) and the civic habit are solid white with white stockings.
Sec. 8.    The engolpion is worn as usual on a chain.
Sec. 9.    The saturno of the Archfather may be red or, for less formal usage, white.
Sec. 10.    The Pontifical stole is in red or gold. Only red may be used when the liturgical colour is purple, rose, or black, and only the gold stole is used during Paschaltide.
Sec. 11.    The pontifical dress of the Papa-Catholicos consists of a red and gold mantum with train of approximately one metre in length. It is worn with the papal tiara or the mitre outside liturgy and the mitre within liturgy. It is also used any time that a cope is otherwise prescribed. The mantum is not used for solemn arrival during penitential rites, when instead the cappa magna is used. The mantulum is a shorter, floor-length version of the mantum and may be worn when more practical and when a cope is otherwise called for in liturgy. It is in the same colour as the mantum.
Sec. 12.    The Papa-Catholicos, regardless of the rite being celebrated, uses the liturgical vesture of the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite. Sec. 13.    If a member of a religious order is elected to the Office of Archfather, he shall make use of the regular habit of the Archfather in white and red as usual and defined herein, not in the colors of the religious order. 
Sec. 14.    The pontifical or papal tiara consists of a triple crown.
Sec. 15.    The tiara is usually used as prescribed in place of the mitre when giving the Apostolic Blessing with Plenary Indulgence. 
Sec. 16.    If the tiara is used during a solemn mass, then it is worn after the conclusion of the mass with mass vestments procession outward.
Sec. 17.    The Archfather is entitled to the use of the sedia gestatoria within all areas pertaining to his jurisdiction and activity.
Sec. 18.    The Archfather is entitled to the use of two flabella of ostrich feathers.
Sec. 19.    The Archfather may use the ferula, consisting of a crucifix atop a long staff, or the baculum, consisting of a cross on a short staff, in accordance with the rules pertaining to the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine Rite.
Can. 142.   The Electoral Bishops wear the mantelletta in red at all times underneath the mozzetta. Cardinals do not wear the mantelletta except in the presence of the Archfather or within any of his territory when he is present therein.
Can. 143.    The Electoral Bishops are entitled to the use of the pallium.   

Clerical Heraldry

Can. 144.   
Sec. 1.    Clerics are entitled to coats of arms according to their personal and clerical dignity, as outlined within this Canon.
Sec. 2.    Sub-Deacon and Minor Clerics: Personal arms without the galero.
Sec. 3.    Deacon: Personal arms with a black galero without tassels.
Sec. 4.    Priest: Personal arms with a black galero with one black tassel on each side. Rectors may have two tassels on each side. The tassels and cords of a priest may be optionally interwoven with white.
Sec. 5.    Canon, Deans, and Archdeacons: For a Canon of a Cathedral or Diocesan Chapter, or a Dean or Archdeacon of a Suffragan See, personal arms with a black galero with six black tassels on each side. For a Canon of the Patriarchal Chapter, personal arms with a purple galero and ten purple tassels on each side for the Canons. Titular Bishops and Archbishops, Deans ad Honorem, and the First Archdeacon of the Apostolic See may use a purple galero with ten red tassels. A member or member emeritus of the Patriarchal Curia who is not a Canon but who is a priest is thus entitled to the prelatial honors if specifically granted by the Patriarch, and further is entitled to use the black galero with three purple tassels on each side. A member or member emeritus of a Metropolitan or Diocesan Curia who is not a Canon but is a priest is thus entitled to the use of the black galero with three black tassels on each side, and further entitled to the prelatial honors if specifically granted by their respective Metropolitan or Ordinary. Prelates di Fiochetto, being the Governor-General, Arch-Chancellor, Prefect of Faith and Doctrine, Prefect of the Patriarchal Aerarium, Treasurer of the Patriarchal Curia, First Archdeacon, Prefect-General of the Stato Pontificio (if a cleric), and Pontifical Maggiordomo (if a cleric), if they be not Cardinals, are entitled to a purple galero with fifteen red tassels on each side.
Sec. 6.    Superior of an Order: Personal arms with a black galero and six black tassels on each side. The arms may be marshaled with those of their jurisdiction. If the order’s habit is white, then the galero and tassels may be white.
Sec. 7.    Abbot: Personal arms surmounted with a simplex mitre and two crossed, veiled crosiers behind the shield, or one veiled crosier crossed with a single episcopal cross. Additionally, an optional black galero with six black tassels on each side may be used. The arms may be marshaled with those of their jurisdiction. If the order’s habit is white, then the galero and tassels may be white.
Sec. 8.    Consecrated Abbot: Personal arms surmounted with a simplex mitre and two crossed, veiled crosiers behind the shield, or one veiled crosier crossed with a single episcopal cross. Additionally, an optional black galero with six black tassels on each side may be used. If the order’s habit is white, then the galero and tassels may be white.
Sec. 9.    Suffragan Bishop and Bishop Co-Adjutor: Personal arms surmounted by a non-jeweled mitre. Behind the shield may be two crossed crosiers. Additionally, an optional green galero with six green tassels on each side may be used, as may the single episcopal cross.
Sec. 10.    Bishop Ordinary: Personal arms marshaled with the arms of their diocese (in dexter) surmounted by a jeweled mitre. Behind the shield may be two crossed crosiers or a single-barred cross and a crosier. Additionally, an optional green galero with six green tassels on each side may be used, as may the single episcopal cross.
Sec. 11.    Archbishop Co-Adjutor or other Non-Jurisdictional Archbishop: Personal arms surmounted by a non-jeweled mitre. Behind the shield may be a double-barred cross and a crosier. Additionally, an optional green galero with ten green tassels on each side may be used, as may the double archiepiscopal cross.
Sec. 12.    Metropolitan Archbishop: Personal arms marshaled with the arms of their archdiocese (in dexter) surmounted by a jeweled mitre. Behind the shield may be a double-barred cross and a crosier. Additionally, an optional green galero with ten green tassels on each side may be used. Beneath the shield may be suspended the pallium.
Sec. 13.    The armourial bearings of the Archfather constitute arms of dominion. The arms used in perpetutity are those of the House of Johnson-Ivrea-Italia-Barcelona. In their lesser (shield only) for, they are blazoned as: Azure an eagle displayed Argent. They are surmounted by the Patriarchal insignia, viz., a gold key cross with a gold sword (with silver blade), surmounted by the Papal tiara as a symbol of the authority of the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 14.    In the Pontifical greater arms, the shield has six divisions. They are given as follows: Historic arms of the Apostolic See of Sts. Stephen and Mark, being the arms of the Most Holy Patriarchal Basilica of Santa Maria Antiqua and, formerly, of the Archdiocese of the Southwest; Etruria; Spanish Ivrea (Barcelona quartered with Castile y León, with France in pretense); Würzburg, with ecclesiastical Würzburg (specifically Franconia only, with a symmetrical Celtic cross Sable) in pretense, surmounted by an electoral bonnet; Etruria (ancien regime); quarterly: Florence, Sainte Animie, Valais, Daniell; Overall in pretense, Santa Croce (with Johnson-Ivrea in pretense as usual thereupon). The motto upon a scroll is "Honos Ministerium Fides." Atop the shield is a royal crown. Atop the crown are two grilled helms affront Or. The dexter helm is surmounted by a jeweled and crowned mitre; atop the sinister helm, issuant from a chapeau Gules turned up Ermine, is set for a crest a fleur-de-lis Gules charged with a sword Argent crossed, hilted, and pommeled Argent. For supporters, on each side, St. George and the dragon. Behind the shield are placed two flags, in dexter of Imperial Italy and in sinister of Pontifical Ruthenia, and the batons of the Grand Master of the Order of the Eagle of St. Stephen and Mary Immculate. The entire shield is upon a black doppeladler, with gold arms and beak and a red tongue, above which is the Roman gold imperial crown. Pendant from the shield are the collars of the Supreme Order of Christ and the Pontifical Order of the Eagle, and also of the Pontifical Crown Order of Westphalia and the Noble Company of Saint Mary of Walsingham.  The achievement is displayed upon a mantle Or lined Ermine with gold eagles thereupon; with a pavilion likewise Or, with red crosses of St. Stephen thereupon; with panels Gules. The pavilion is surmounted by the pontifical tiara. Behind the pavilion are placed the crossed key and sword. Outside the mantle are set two ombrellini Gules and Or. In dexter, the ombrellino is surmounted by a cross of St. Stephen Gules, with the same cross upon each of the panels Or. The pole of the ombrellino is issuant from a pile of three stones, one-and-two Argent, representing the stones of martyrdom of Saint Stephen. In sinister, the ombrellino is surmounted by a cross of Mary Immaculate Azure, with the same cross upon each of the panels Or. The pole of the ombrellino is issuant from a mound Vert and three lilies Argent. Each pole is supported by a kneeling angel Argent. Behind the achievement on either side are two flags of the Imperial Roman Church. On large vertical poles, one on each side, is the flag of the Pontifical Imperial State of Rome-Ruthenia. Around the mantle is a green wreath upon which are five small shields: 1) Rome, surmounted by the pontifical insignia; 2) Ruthenia, surrounded by a traditional Russian crown; 3) Trier, surmounted by an electoral bonnet; 4) Mainz, surmounted by an electoral bonnet; and 5) Cologne, surmounted by an electoral bonnet.
Sec. 15.    The imperial (or pontifical) eagle is the same eagle as used in the greater arms. It is given in several forms. The greater pontifical eagle is the same eagle as used in the greater arms, with the pontifical insignia surmounting it, and with a green wreath at the bottom with the same five shields as in the greater arms. The middle form is the same eagle, but with only the shield. The lesser form is the same as the middle eagle, but with the same shield as in the pontifical lesser arms. The small, or ordinary, pontifical eagle is the same style, without the shield.
Sec. 16.    The middle arms of the Florentine-Roman Papa consist of the pontifical eagle upon the same mantle and pavilion as used in the greater arms, with the wreath and small shields.

Church Tradition and Protocol

Can. 145.    All other aspects of the ceremonial and liturgical life of the Church not contained in the Code of Canon Law or the rubrics may be covered in Pontifical Ceremonial Directives, provided that they do not violate the Code of Canon Law, imply doctrinal changes, or violate Sacred Tradition. Metropolitan Archbishops and Bishops Ordinary of Suffragan Dioceses may similarly amend their own ceremonial and liturgical practices, provided these changes do not violate the Code of Canon Law or Pontifical Ceremonial Directives, imply doctrinal changes, or violate Sacred Tradition.
Can. 146.   
Sec. 1.    Following traditional Church customs and practices, this Canon specifies the protocol and vesture of deceased clergy of theImperial Roman Church at their funeral and requiem liturgy.
Sec. 2.    The deceased clergy is traditionally vested by priests when possible.
Sec. 3.    The casket should be covered with a black or purple pall. The pall shall never be white. 
Sec. 4.    The Requiem mass itself is for clergy the same as that for the laity, using the appropriate prayers for priests and bishops.
Sec. 5.    Vesture of Deceased Deacons: The bier (or casket) is laid in the church for the Requiem liturgy with the head closest to the altar (where the laity is positions with the feet closest to the altar). This is for all ranks of clergy. The Deacon shall be vested in penitential mass vestments, which shall include black cassock, black rope or band cincture (optional), amice, alb, white rope cincture, (for the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, purple maniple on the left arm), purple Deacon's stole over the left shoulder, and purple Dalmatic. Upon the feet shall be black sock and black shoes. Upon the head is placed the black biretta or hat according to Rite if space permits. In the hands shall be placed a crucifix, rosary, or chotki.
Sec. 6.    Vesture of Deceased Priests: The vesture of deceased priests is the same as that of Deacons, except that the purple stole is worn in the manner of a priest, that is around the neck and crossed in the form of an X over the chest. Also, instead of a Dalmatic, the purple Chasuble is used for the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, and a purple cope for the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine and Anglican-Byzantine Rites. If the priest is a Canon, Dean, or Archdeacon, the cassock and fascia should be their prelatial choir cassock. The socks for Deans and Archdeacons of the Apostolic See should be purple. The biretta may have a purple or red tuft according to their state, and, optionally, matching purple or red piping according to their state.
Sec. 7.    Vesture of Deceased Bishops: The deceased bishop shall be vested in purple cassock, purple band cincture (fascia), amice, alb, rope cincture,  (for the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, purple maniple on the left arm), pectoral cross over the alb for the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites or else engolpion for the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine and Anglican-Byzantine Rites), purple stole worn in the manner of a bishop (around the neck and not crossed in the front as a priest), purple Dalmatic (Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites) or pianeta (Gallo-Russo-Byzantine and Anglican-Byzantine Rites), and purple Chasuble for the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rites, or a purple cope for the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine and Anglican-Byzantine Rites. For a Gallo-Russo-Byzantine or Anglican-Byzantine Bishop, the omophore is used. If the Bishop is a Anglo-Roman or Gallo-Roman Metropolitan or otherwise so entitled, the pallium is placed over the chasuble. For a Gallo-Russo-Byzantine or Anglican-Byzantine Archbishop, the pallium is placed over the cope as usual. The simplex mitre according to Rite shall be placed on the head if there is room. Else it shall be placed in the hands, laying against the torso. The purple episcopal gloves are placed on the hands for the Anglo-Roman and Gallo-Roman Rite, and optionally for the Gallo-Russo-Byzantine and Anglican-Byzantine Rites. The episcopal ring is placed (over the glove) on the right ring finger (4th finger). In the hands is placed a crucifix, rosary, or chotki as usual. On the feet shall be the footwear the bishop for mass, i.e., either purple episcopal sandals and purple buskins, or purple prelatial socks and purple, dark red or black slippers or shoes, according to the use of the individual bishop, in accordance with tradition and Canon Law. The crosier, as a symbol of jurisdiction, is not placed in the casket (or on the bier), or anywhere near it. Neither is it carried in front of or by the bier (or casket).
Sec. 8.    For Cardinals, that which was described as purple for a bishop is red, and the pectoral cross cord is red and gold. Red liturgical vestments are used. The pall is red.   
Sec. 9.    For Electoral Bishops, identical to that of a deceased Metropolitan, including purple mass vestments, except that the cassock, zucchetto, and stockings are red.
Sec. 10.    The vesture of a deceased Papa-Catholicos is similar to that of a Bishop, except that the pall is red, the habit is white, and the mass vestments are red, with fanon, omophore, and pallium as usual. The tiara may be carried in procession.
Sec. 11.    A jeweled mitre according to Rite may be placed, laid flat, at the head of the casket of a jurisdictional bishop.
Sec. 12.    A golden mitre according to Rite may be placed, laid flat, at the head of the casket of a Suffragan bishop.
Sec. 12.    Vesture of Clergy in Religious Orders: Clergy in religious orders shall be vested as above, according to their rank, except that the biretta is only worn if permitted by the rule of their order, and in lieu of the cassock shall be their habit. In the case of orders with a rule prescribing certain footwear, that footwear is used in lieu of that prescribed above.
Can. 147.     The use of ecclesiastical styles, in accordance with precedent and tradition, shall be according to the protocol established by Canon Law and other directives of the Apostolic See or offices thereof.
Can. 148.   
Sec. 1.    The protocol for Deacons, Sub-Deacons, clerics in Minor Orders, and tonsured clerics are given in this Canon.
Sec. 2.    Formal Style: The Reverend Dom Full Name or Rev. Dom Full Name
Sec. 3.    Envelope Address: The Reverend Dom Full Name or Rev. Dom Full Name
Sec. 4.    Written Form of Address: Reverend Dom First Name or Dom First Name
Sec. 5.    Written Address (informal): Dom First Name
Sec. 6.    Spoken Form of Address: Dom First Name
Sec. 7.    What is stated here in this Section as “Dom” may be substituted with “Don.”
Can. 149.   
Sec. 1.    The protocol for a Priest is given in this Canon.
Sec. 2.    Formal Style: As given for Deacons and Minor Clerics, for secular priests; For religious priests, the style of Father is used in place of Dom. 
Sec. 3.    Envelope Address: The Reverend Dom Full Name or Rev. Dom Full Name for secular priests, and The Reverend Father Full Name or Rev. Fr. Full Name for religious priests; Written Form of Address: Dom First Name for secular priests; Father for religious priests.
Sec. 4.    Written Address (informal): Dom First Name for secular priests, and Father First Name for religious priests; N.b. All priests sign their name
with a single cross, i.e., + after the name.;
Sec. 5.    Spoken Form of Address: Dom First Name for secular priests or Father First Name for religious priests; it is permissible to address secular priests as "Father" as a matter of custom.
Sec. 6.    Spoken Address (informal): Dom First Name for secular priests or Father for religious priests;
Sec. 7.    Reverence of Office: The faithful should stand when a priest enters the room and remain standing until invited to sit. Men must remove their hats in his presence. The faithful may ask for and receive a blessing (especially if the priest is the parish rector and is visiting the house of one of the faithful of his parish) in which case one should kneel on the left knee unless kneeling would be awkward or impossible. It is also acceptable to kiss the right hand of any priest as a sign of respect for their duty of consecrating the Eucharist. Reverential gestures should be repeated by the faithful when leaving his presence.
Can. 150.     
Sec. 1.    The protocol for a Prelate is given in this Canon.
Sec. 2.    Formal Style for Deans and Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter and Pontifical Chamberlains: The Very Reverend Monsignor Full Name or Very Rev. Msgr. Full Name. For the Archdeacon, “The Very Reverend and Venerable” is used instead of “The Very Reverend.” All Canons use the style of “Excellency.” These styles apply to all clerics who are prelates in the stated ranks.
a.    Prelates ex-officio of an Ordinary or Metropolitan See use the style of Reverend Monsignor, if this usage has been granted by their episcopal authority. Otherwise they use the style of Reverend Canon, Reverend Dean, or Reverend Archdeacon, according to rank.
Sec. 3.    Envelope Address: The Very Reverend (and Venerable) Monsignor Full Name or The Very Rev. (and Ven.) Msgr. Full Name or Very Rev. Ven. Msgr. Full Name; Written Form of Address: Very Reverend (and Venerable) Monsignor or Very Reverend (and Venerable) Lord;
Sec. 4.    Written Address (informal); Monsignor Surname;
Sec. 5.    Spoken Form of Address: Monsignor or Monsignor Surname at the first instance; and then "Monsignor" may be used thereafter.
Sec. 6.    Spoken Address (informal): Monsignor.
Sec. 7.    Reverence of Office: The faithful and regular clergy should stand when the prelate enters the room and remain standing until invited to sit. Men must remove their hats in his presence. The faithful may ask for and receive a blessing, if he is a priest, in which case one should kneel on the left knee unless kneeling would be awkward or impossible. The reverential gestures should be repeated when leaving his presence.
Can. 151.     The protocol for a Bishop is given in this Canon.
Sec. 1.    Formal Style: His Grace the Right Reverend Full Name or H.G. the Rt. Rev. Full Name (N.b. This may be written in less formal circumstances without H.G.) or His Grace (or H.G.) Bishop Full Name; N.b. After the style of a Bishop as given, their specific title as Ordinary or Suffragan may be appended following their name;
Sec. 2.    Envelope Address: His Grace the Right Reverend Full Name or H.G. the Rt. Rev. Full Name;
Sec. 3.    Written Form of Address: Your Grace or Right Reverend Father or Right Reverend Lord or (most formal) Your Right Reverend Grace;
Sec. 4.    Written Address (informal): Bishop or Monsignor; N.b. All bishops sign their names with a single cross, i.e., +, before their name. Archbishops may alternatively use a double patriarchal cross, i.e., ‡, but should not use two single crosses, i.e., ++.
Sec. 5.    Spoken Form of Address: Your Grace or (most formal) Your Right Reverend Grace;
Sec. 6.    Spoken Address (informal): Bishop Surname
or Bishop or Monsignor;
Sec. 7.    Conclusion of correspondence: Kissing the Sacred Ring, I have the honor to remain Your Grace's most humble servant;
Sec. 8.    Reverence of Office: The faithful and regular clergy should stand when a bishop enters the room and remain standing until invited to sit. Men must remove their hats in his presence. Kneel on the left knee and kiss ring as sign of respect for his office. One may ask for and receive a blessing. If kneeling would be awkward or impossible, bow at the waist and kiss his ring. Reverential gestures should be repeated when leaving his presence.
Can. 152.     The styles for an Archbishop are the same as those given above for a Bishop, except that "Bishop" is replaced with "Archbishop," and "the Right Reverend" is replaced with "the Most Reverend," abbreviated "the Most Rev." Metropolitan Archbishops may append the title of their See after their name, e.g. "Archbishop of...." Titular Archbishops of the rank only may append "Archbishop" after the name, provided it has not been written before the name. The reverences of office are also the same as for a Bishop.
Can. 153.     
Sec. 1.    The general protocol for the Papa-Catholicos of Rome-Ruthenia is given in this Canon.
Sec. 2.    The full ecclesiastical and state styles are specified in acts thereunto appertaining.
Sec. 3.    Formal Style: His Most Divine Holiness and Most August Eminence Papa (Pontifical Name), or, His Holiness Papa (Pontifical Name). (The abbreviation H.H. or H.H.E. may be used. Papa is customarily in its Latin form and may be abbreviated "Pp.") His other titles may be appended as appropriate.
Sec. 4.    The Archfather signs only his pontifical name, in Cyrillic, followed by “Пп.” and the dynastic numeral; or else by initial only, whether using a Cyrillic or Latin letter.  His signature rota consists of a circle divided for quadrants by a cross. In the upper left quadrant is “Sanctus Stephanus,” and in the upper right quadrant is “Sanctus Marcus.” His regnal name and “Pp. (dynastical numeral),” all in Latin letters, are written across the bottom to quadrants. At the top of the quadrant divider is a cross. Around the quadrants within the circlet are the three mottos the Pontifical Court and the Pontifical Imperial State, viz., Honos Ministerium Fides, Plus Ultra, and Ecclesia Patria Nostra.
Sec. 5.    The Seal of the Deacon is the personal seal of the Papa-Catholicos. The image is of St. Stephen the Deacon and Protomartyr, celestial patron of the Apostolic See. St. Stephen holds the Key of St. Peter and Sword of St. Mark, representing the Archfather as successor to Pope St. Leo X and temporal successor to St. Peter the Apostles, and as Custodian of the Apostolic See of St. Mark at Aquileia.
Sec. 6.    Conclusion of correspondence: “Kissing the Sacred Foot, I have the honour to remain Your Most Divine Holiness's most humble and devoted servant,”.  And note that the full style may be abbreviated here and elsewhere to Your Holiness.
Sec. 7.    Reverence of Office: Most formally, the faithful and clergy should kneel on the left knee, bow, and touch the right foot of the Papa-Catholicos with the right hand. Less formally, the standard kiss of the ring as a sign of respect for the office is acceptable. If kneeling cannot be done, then bow. One may ask for and receive a blessing. Stand when he enters the room and remain standing until invited to sit. Men must remove their hats in his presence. Reverential gestures should be repeated when leaving his presence.
Sec. 8.    The common forms of Pontifical Documents are as follows:
Pontifical Constitution: The highest level of legislative document in importance issued by the Papa-Catholicos. It is issued with a bull seal (see below), the state seal in wax pendant from a red ribbon, and the Seal of the Deacon, and also bears the pontifical coat of arms. It is headed as given for a bulla below.
Pontifical Bulla: A bull refers to the general form of the document, and it can pertain to many legislative topics. It is issued with a bull seal (silver in colour, with an image of St. Stephen on the front and the name of the Archfather on the reverse), pendant from threads usually of red and yellow, and the Seal of the Deacon in ink on the front, and also bears the pontifical coat of arms. It is headed as "[Name] [Dynastic Numeral] Episcopus et Servus Servorum Christi,” given in Latin letters.
Apostolic Mandates: A form of bull specifically for the authorisation to consecrate a bishop or bless an Abbot, and for episcopal and abbatial appointments. They are headed in the standard manner for a bull.
Encyclicals: Formal legislative or pastoral letters addressed to a specific person or group, or to the entirety of the faithful. They are headed "[Name] Papa [Dynastic Numeral]," given in Cyrillic letters.
Pontifical Letter: Similar to an encyclical and written in a similar form. Typically more pastoral in nature. Headed as given for an encyclical.
Pontifical Decree: A legislative statement. Headed as given for an encyclical.
Pontifical Motu Proprio: A legislative statement or a direction. Headed as given for an encyclical.
Pontifical Rescript: A formal response to a procedural enquiry. Headed as given for an encyclical.
Pontifical Major Brevet: A document conferring an office or privilege. They are issued for ordination at the order of Sub-Deacon and above, for appointments to the Nobile Anticamera Segreta and to certain curial offices, and for the Pontifical Honours and heraldic grants. They are sealed with the Seal of the Deacon in ink, as well as other seals of the Curia, and have a large wax seal pendant from a ribbon usually red in colour. They are headed "[Name] [Dynastic Numeral] Pont. Max.," rendered in the Russian language using  Cyrillic letters.
Pontifical Minor Brevet: Smaller in size than a major brevet, it serves the same function. They are issued for ordination at the orders below Sub-Deacon and for appointments to the Seconda Anticamera and certain curial offices. They are sealed with the Seal of the Deacon in ink, as well as other seals of the Curia. They are headed "[Name] [Dynastic Numeral] Pont. Max," rendered in the Russian language using Cyrillic letters.
Pontifical Brief: A brief can fulfill the same purpose as a bull, major brevet, or minor brevet. It is written in the second person rather than the usual formulaic style of brevets. They are sealed with the Seal of the Deacon in ink and then folded unevenly in thirds and sealed in wax with the signet ring of the Archfather. They are headed as given for a minor brevet.
Pontifical Letters Patent: For the conferral of titles within the nobility of the patriarchate. They consist of several pages of documents bound together in a cover with red, yellow, blue, and white threads and sealed with a large wax pendant seal, the Seal of the Deacon in ink, and various other curial seals, as well as a marca da bollo. 
Sec. 9.    The Papa-Catholicos, in representation of both the eastern and western traditions and heritage of the Apostolic See of Saints Stephen and Mark, shall always use a signature that is of the pontifical name, followed by the abbreviation Pp., followed by the dynastic numeral, rendered in the Russian language using Cyrillic letters.
Sec. 10.    Following Sec. 9 of this canon, the formal cypher likewise shall be of the first letter of the pontifical name, followed by P., in cyrillic, in gold on a red background, within a gold wreath with green ribbon, surmounted by the tiara, with the crossed key and sword at the bottom of the wreath.
Sec. 11.   Following Sec. 9 and Sec. 10 of this canon, the heading of all formal documents of the Papa-Catholicos shall be as denoted in this canon for minor brevets or else they are headed with the abbreviation Pp. following the pontifical name, all followed by the dynastic numeral, in cyrillic letters. General documents are most commonly headed in Latin, Italian, or Russian, but may be headed in any of the official languages of the Pontifical Imperial State as appropriate, the others being English, Spanish, German, French, and Greek. Document text for formal documents of the Papa-Catholicos is most commonly in Latin, though certain documents retain by custom the use of other languages, which may further be specified in decree. In general correspondence, the body of a document is in the language most appropriate to the circumstances, whether an official language of the Pontifical Imperial State or not.
Can. 154.     
Sec. 1.    Additions to the styles of address given in Canon Law shall be governed by this Canon.
Sec. 2.    Clerics with Doctorates: Add Doctor before the name and “Dom,” but after all styles above.;
Sec. 3.    Clerics with personal titles entitling them to the style of Excellency: Add the Most Illustrious before Reverend. For Bishops, this addition is placed after “His Grace.”
Sec. 4.    Clerics with personal titles entitling them to the style of Highness: Add the Most Serene before Reverend. For Bishops, this addition is placed after “His Grace.”
Sec. 5.    The Governor-General and Arch-Chancellor use the shortened style of Eminence. Their formal style is Eminence and Imperial and Royal Highness, which same applies to their consorts.

Divine Offices 

Can. 155.      The Divine Offices shall be said in accordance with the rubrics given in the breviary and according to any supplemental Pontifical Instructions or directives.
Can. 156.    The complete cycle of Divine Offices consists of eight offices, three major and five minor, as given in the Anglican and Roman Breviaries. The major offices are Matins, Lauds, and Vespers. The minor offices are Prime, Terce, Sext, None, and Compline, with Terce, Sext, and None comprising the diurnal hours.

Celebration of the Divine Liturgy 

Can. 157.     The Divine Liturgy may be offered privately or as part of public worship.
Can. 158.    The Divine Liturgy may not be celebrated more than one mass per day, except as otherwise provided in the Canons, Ceremonial Directives, and Rubrics. Dispensations may be given for just cause by the appropriate jurisdictional Bishop or the Papa-Catholicos. 

Selection of Clergy 

Can. 159.    In each See, the Bishop Ordinary may appoint a Board of Examining Chaplains, to be comprised of three (3) Canonically Resident, Learned Presbyters (Priests). These presbyters shall have a three (3) year term of office. This board of Examining Chaplains will serve at the Bishop’s pleasure.
Can. 160.    The Bishops Ordinary and Metropolitan Archbishops may ordain deacons and Priests in conformity with Canon Law and the ceremonial tradition of the Apostolic See, using the approved forms. 
Can. 161.    Suffragan Bishops may ordain, in accordance with the Canons, with the approval of the jurisdictional Bishop under whose authority they fall.
Can. 162.     
Sec. 1.    Every person desiring to be admitted a Candidate for Holy Orders is, in the first instance, to consult his Rector, or, if for some just reason he have none, some Presbyter to whom he is personally known, setting before him the grounds of his desire for admission to the Ministry, together with such circumstances as may bear on is qualifications, or tend to affect his course of preparation.
Sec. 2.    If, as the result of a thorough inquiry into the physical, mental, moral and spiritual qualifications of the applicant, he is counseled by the aforesaid Presbyter to persevere in his intentions, he shall make his desire known personally, if possible, or else in writing to the Bishop in whose jurisdiction he has been canonically resident for the three (3) months preceding, and further report to the same Bishop in writing his qualifications, as stated above, for the work of ministry.
Sec. 3.    Each postulant shall state to the Bishop in writing the following: His full name and age; the length of time he has been resident in the Diocese or Archdiocese; when, and by whom, he was baptized; when, and by whom, he was confirmed; when, and where, he was admitted to the Holy Communion; whether he has ever before applied for admission as a Postulant or as a Candidate for Holy Orders in any jurisdiction or church; on what grounds he is moved to seek the Sacred Ministry; his qualifications for the work of ministry.
Sec. 4.    The Bishop, in a record to be kept for that purpose, shall enter the name of each applicant, with the fact of his approval or disapproval of the applicant, and the date of such entry.  If he approve of the application, he shall inform the applicant of the fact, and of the date of his admission as Postulant.
Sec. 5.    Similar records shall be made and information given of the removal of a name from the list of Postulants.  Without further reason, the Bishop may remove the name of a Postulant who fails to be admitted as a Candidate for Holy Orders within four years from the date of his reception as a Postulant.
Can. 163.    Only men shall be admitted to the clerical state and the Holy Orders of any grade, in accordance with historical Church Doctrine and Tradition. This Canon shall not be amended.
Can. 164.     Clerics must be ordained to the Holy Orders in order of grade from lower to higher.   
Can. 165.   
Sec. 1.    No Bishop shall accept as a Postulant any person who has been refused for admission as a Postulant or as a Candidate for Holy Orders in any other Diocese or Archdiocese, whether within or without the Imperial Roman Church, or who, having been admitted, has afterwards ceased to be a Postulant or a Candidate, until he shall have produced a certificate from the Ecclesiastical Authority of the Diocese or Archdiocese in which he has been refused admission, or in which he has been a Postulant or a Candidate, declaring the cause of refusal or of cessation.
Sec. 2.    Should the Bishop accept such applicant as a Postulant, he shall send the said certificate, or a copy thereof, to the appropriate committee within the Council of Clergy of the Archdiocese or Dicoese for recording of his candidacy for Holy Orders.
Can. 166.     Candidates for the Minor Orders follow the same procedure as established for candidates for the Major Orders provided they intend to seek Major Orders. 
Can. 167.    A Postulant, before his admission as a Candidate for Holy Orders, must lay before the Bishop and the Board of Examining Chaplains satisfactory evidence that he has sufficient education, together with a full statement of educational work. 
Can. 168.    The Board of Examining Chaplains may, at their discretion, accept, in place of examination, satisfactory evidence that the Postulant has fulfilled the requirements in any one or more of the subjects specified in Canon Law or other directives and procedures. Can. 169.     All authority vested in the Board of Examining Chaplains may similarly be exercised by the Bishop Ordinary. The Bishop, a Board of Examining Chaplains notwithstanding, is the ultimate authority within a diocese regarding ordination, subject to Canon Law and other higher directives other than the Papa-Catholicos and his duly-appointed representatives.
Can. 170.     No man shall be admitted to the Major Orders without taking and signing the Oath of Ordination as set forth by the Apostolic See. Furthermore, if the postulant is validly married, then he shall not be ordained unless his wife signs her assent and further takes an oath to support her husband’s ministry.
Can. 171.    Those who have been ordained to the Sub-Diaconate may not licitly marry without the explicit permission and dispensation given by the Supreme Pontiff. Those who attempt matrimony after being ordained to the Sub-Diaconate without said permission incur the penalty latae sententiae of deposition from the clerical state, laicization, and excommunication reserved to the Apostolic See of Saints Stephen and Mark. 
Can. 172.    Those who are married and seek Ordination to the Major Orders must be validly married in accordance with Canon Law. All previous marriages must receive a decree of nullity by the apropriate Diocesan or Metropolitan Tribunal or a tribunal of the Apostolic See.
Can. 173.    Men in the Minor Orders, through the Order of Acolyte, must have the permission of the Apostolic See of Saints Stephen and Mark to marry. If they marry, they are bound to do so licitly and validly, else they incur automatic suspension of their clerical faculties and excommunication reserved to the Apostolic See.
Can. 174.     The Vicariate-General or the Chancery of the Diocese or Archdiocese, upon receipt of the reports and the certificate or certificates as prescribed in Canon Law for a postulant to Holy Orders, and having no reason to suppose the existence of any sufficient objection on grounds either physical, mental, moral, or spiritual, to the admission of the applicant, may recommend the Postulant for admission to Candidateship, by a testimonial bearing the signatures of the Vicar-General or the Chancellor, and addressed to the Bishop.
Can. 175.     When all requirements set forth in Canon Law and other directives have been complied with, the Bishop may admit the Postulant as a Candidate for Holy Orders.  He shall thereupon record his name, with the date of his admission, in a record to be kept for that purpose, and shall inform the Candidate, the Vicar-General and/or the Chancellor, and any other relevant person or committee specified by the Bishop of the fact and date of such admission.
Can. 176.   
Sec. 1.    The superintendence of all Candidates for Holy Orders, both as to their daily life and as to the direction of their theological studies, devolves on the Bishop of the diocese to which they belong. 
Sec. 2.    The Bishop may, at his discretion, ask one or more of a duly-appointed Board of Examining Chaplains to assist him in this superintendence.
Sec. 3.    Every Candidate shall pursue his studies diligently under proper direction; he shall not indulge in vain or trifling conduct or in amusements unfavorable to godly and studious habits and to that good report which becomes a person preparing for the Holy Ministry.
Sec. 4.    A Candidate must remain in canonical connection with the Diocese in which he is ordained and with the Imperial Roman Church.
Sec. 5.    Every candidate for Holy Orders shall report himself to the Ecclesiastical Authority, personally, or by letter, at least four times a year, typically in the Ember Weeks, giving account of his manner of life and progress in his studies; and if he fail to make such report to the satisfaction of the Ecclesiastical Authority, his name may be stricken from the list of Candidates at the discretion of the Bishop.
Sec. 6.    If a Candidate for Holy Orders shall fail to present himself for examination within three (3) years from the date of his admission as a Candidate, his name may, after due notice, be stricken from the list of Candidates at the discretion of the Bishop.
Sec. 7.    A Candidate for Holy Orders in any Suffragan See of the Imperial Roman Church, or of any Church in communion with this Church, whose name shall have been stricken from the list of Candidates, or whose application or ordination shall have been rejected, shall not be ordained without readmission to candidateship, said candidateship to continue for not less than one year.
Can. 204.   
Sec. 1.    All Suffragan Sees within the Anglican Rite Roman Catholic Church may admit men to the Order of Priest as Simplex Priests.
Sec. 2.    Simplex priests may fulfill all functions of the priesthood except hearing confessions, preaching, and teaching (beyond the catechism).
Sec. 3.    Preaching by Simplex priests may be done from sermons pre-approved by the Bishop.
Sec. 4.    The requirement for ordination as a Simplex priest is the same as for the priesthood, except that theological training need only to the level of a catechist.
Sec. 5.    Simplex priests must, in accordance with Canon Law and Church tradition, be admitted first to the Order of Deacon.
Sec. 6.    Simplex priests may gain full priestly faculties by completion of the standard theological formation and standard requirements for ordination to the priesthood as set forth in Canon Law.
Sec. 7.    Smplex Priests are not eligible to be elevated to the Order of Bishop without first being given full faculties as a priest.
Can. 177.     Before being ordained in any diocese, a candidate must have the recommendation of such clerics as set forth as so required by his Bishop, which can include his parrochial rector, the Council of Clergy of the diocese, or other such clergy as required.
Can. 178.    A candidate for Holy Orders must be no less than eighteen (18) years old for commissioning to the Minor Orders, twenty-one (21) years of age, if a candidate to be ordained a Deacon or Priest, and have successfully passed a psychological examination approved by the Bishop Ordinary.
Can. 179.    A candidate for ordination to the Major Orders shall have successfully completed a course of theological and pastoral studies as required by the Bishop Ordinary, the ecclesiastical province, or the Apostolic See.
Can. 180.   The forms and methods of examination for Holy Orders are set by the Bishop Ordinary and the Apostolic See.  Each diocese may adopt their own procedures for examining candidates, provided that said procedures do not violate Canon Law or directives of higher authorities.
Can. 181.     As necessary, the Supreme Pontiff of the Imperial Roman Church retains the authority to ordain or approve for ordination all men whom he believes to be both called to the ministry and sufficiently educated and prepared for it, on his own initiative, acting in the favor of the Faith.
Can. 182.    The statutory age of retirement of all clergy other than the Papa-Catholicos is seventy (70 years). However, this requirement may be waived by dispensation of the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 183.     All clergy may resign from office at any time, provided they make their intentions known in writing to their superior and both Canon Law and other directives and procedures pertaining to clerical resignation are made known. Those who have been ordained to the Order of Sub-Deacon and above, however, retain the indelible mark of Holy Orders forever; though their function in those Orders may be limited by proper ecclesiastical authority.
Can. 184.     
Sec. 1.    Bishops may seek retirement from office at any time.
Sec. 2.    Only Bishops serving in their respective office for no less than one calendar year are entitled to the status of Bishop Emeritus.
Sec. 3.    The granting of emeritus status is at the discretion of the appropriate authority.  In the case of a Bishop Coadjutor, Bishop Suffragan or Auxiliary Bishop of a Diocese, the appropriate authority is the Bishop Ordinary. In the case of a Bishop Ordinary of a Diocese or a Bishop Coadjutor or Auxiliary Bishop of an Archdiocese, the appropriate authority is the Metropolitan Archbishop. In the case of a Metropolitan Archbishop, or any Bishops or Archbishops of the Apostolic See, the appropriate authority is the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 185.     
Sec. 1.    Except in an emergency, a Bishop seeking retirement or resignation must give no less than one hundred eighty (180) days notice in writing to the appropriate authority before retirement or resignation is to become effective.
Sec. 2.    In the case of a Bishop Coadjutor, Bishop Suffragan or Auxiliary Bishop of a Diocese, the appropriate authority is the Bishop Ordinary. In the case of a Bishop Ordinary of a Diocese or a Bishop Coadjutor or Auxiliary Bishop of an Archdiocese, the appropriate authority is the Metropolitan Archbishop. In the case of a Metropolitan Archbishop, or any Bishops or Archbishops of the Apostolic See, the appropriate authority is the Papa-Catholicos. In all cases, Bishops seeking retirement should be made known to the Apostolic See.
Can. 186.    A retired Bishop may serve as a Suffragan Bishop at the discretion of and pleasure of the incumbent Diocesan. Retired Archbishops may serve, as Archbishop Emeritus, as an advisor to any Bishop Ordinary or Metropolitan Archbishop or in any other auxiliary capacity at the discretion of said Bishop Ordinary or Metropolitan. Should the Papa-Catholicos retire or resign from office, he retains the status of Papa-Catholicos Emeritus and that of all other ranks and titles associated therewith, duly appended with “Emeritus,” may choose to serve in an advisory capacity to the incumbent Papa-Catholicos, but may not serve as a Suffragan Bishop or Archbishop to any diocese or ecclesiastical province. All retired Bishops retain their faculties, subject to Canon Law and directives of the Apostolic See.
Can. 187.    Clergy may be suspended by their jurisdictional bishop or the Apostolic See. This decision may be appealed only to the Papa-Catholicos or the Florentine Rota or the Supreme Holy Office. The Papa-Catholicos may remove any cleric or official at any time for any reason.

Diocesan and Metropolian Councils of the Clergy and Laity

Can. 188.    Each Diocese and Metropolitan See (Archdiocese) shall have a Council of Clergy organized in accordance with Canon Law. The Council of Clergy consists of four houses, viz., the House of Bishops, the House of Priests, the House of Deacons, and the House of the Clerics.  The Council of Clergy shall have the jurisdictional Bishop as its titular head. The pro-tempore leader of the Council of Clergy shall be a Bishop appointed by the Bishop Ordinary. This Bishop shall be known as the Proto-Bishop. If there is no Bishop in the diocese other than the Ordinary, then the leader of the House of Priests serves as pro-tempore leader of the Council of Clergy.
Can. 189.     The Vicar-General of the Diocese or, in the absence of a Vicar-General, the Chancellor, if a priest, serves as leader of the House of Priests. If there is neither a Vicar-General nor a Chancellor who is also a priest, then the Ordinary may either appoint a priest to serve as Proto-Priest, or may refer the selection to the House of Priests for election by simple majority.
Can. 190.      The Archdeacon, though not a Deacon himself, is the leader of the House of Deacons. In the absence of an Archdeacon, the Ordinary may either appoint a Deacon to serve as Proto-Deacon, or may refer the selection to the House of Deacons for election by simple majority. Under the Archdeacon, a Proto-Deacon may be elected by the Deacons as leader pro-tempore of the House of Deacons.
Can. 191.     The leader of the House of Clerics, known as the Senior of the House of Clerics, shall be either appointed by the Ordinary from among the Minor Orders, or the Ordinary may refer the selection to the House of Clerics for election by simple majority.
Can. 192.     The Council of the Clergy serves in an advisory capacity to the Ordinary. While the Ordinary retains final authority on all matters pertaining to his diocese under Canon Law, except where otherwise provided under Canon Law, he may refer matters to the various Houses of the Council of the Clergy, or the Council of the Clergy as a whole, for a decision. The Council of the Clergy for an Archdiocese should consist solely of the clergy canonically resident in that Archdiocese. It should not include those in the ecclesiastical province of which said Archdiocese is Metropolitan See, but who are not specifically canonically resident in the Archdiocese.
Can. 193.     The combined Councils of the Clergy of each diocese within an ecclesiastical province under a Metropolitan Archdiocese may be convened by the Metropolitan as deemed necessary for provincial matters. However, the primary function of a Council of the Clergy is to serve the needs of the local diocese. 
Can. 194.    Each Diocese and Archdiocese should maintain a Council of the Laity to ensure that the needs of the faithful are met and their voices heard. The Council of the Laity acts in an advisory capacity only. The Council of the Laity may elect a President, Vice President, Secretary, and other officers as deemed necessary, provided such additions are approved by the Ordinary. Officers may be elected by simple majority vote of a quorum of the council.   
Sec. 1.    Lay delegates to the Metropolitan Council of Laity shall be elected by each congregation of a local diocese on the basis of two (2) delegates for the first twenty-five (25) Communicants in Good Standing of said congregation or fraction thereof, and one (1) delegate for each additional twenty-five (25) Communicants in Good Standing or fraction thereof, subject to the provision of Canon Law for suspension of the right of representation in the diocesan Council of Laity of a Parish which fails to support the diocese with its tithe or assessment, or in some other number as mandated by the Ordinary if necessary. 
Sec. 2.    A Communicant in Good Standing of a congregation is one who is at least eighteen (18) years old, who has been confirmed, made his or her communion at least two times in the preceding year, is a contributor of record and a regular attendee, and shall be those persons meeting the definition of this term as supported by documents of the congregation relative to active participation by the donation of time, talent, and treasure to the working of the church and the furtherance of its mission.
Sec. 3.    The Rector or Priest in Charge of each congregation shall submit to the Ordinary and the Secretary of the Council of the Laity by the first Sunday in Lent of each year, or at some other time determined by the Ordinary, a list of members, determined in accordance with this definition, along with the notification of the names of the delegate(s) and alternate(s) elected to the Council of the Laity no less than sixty (60) days prior to the opening of said council.
Sec. 4.    Any dispute as to the membership qualification of any person so listed shall be resolved by the Ordinary.
Can. 195.      A quorum of the Council of the Clergy consists of no less than two (2) clerics of any house from two-thirds of congregations within the Diocese, and the Ordinary of the Diocese or his appointed representative.
Can. 196.     A quorum of the Council of the Laity consists of one (1) lay delegate from two-thirds of congregations within the diocese, as well as the President of the Council or in his absence the Vice President
Can. 197.   
Sec. 1.    The Council of Clergy meets as one body for the presentation, consideration, deliberation of all measures to be voted on, and consideration and deliberation of all candidates for office.
Sec. 2.    Each House may convene separately to nominate candidates for office. Each House may convene separately to concur in the election of officers.
Sec. 3.    Votes by the Council of Clergy will be by House, that is, by separate ballots in the House of Bishops, the House of Priests, the House of Deacons, and the House of Clerics respectively.
Sec. 4.    Measures to be considered at Council of Clergy may be presented by any of the houses.
Sec. 5.    All measures to be considered at the Council of Clergy will be presented to the Council meeting as one body and will be deliberated on as one body before being voted on by the houses.
Sec. 6.    All measures, after being deliberated by the entire body, will be deliberated on and voted on by each house meeting separately and privately.
Sec. 7.    When voting, each house has one vote. In the event of a tie, the Houses will be requested to deliberate again. If, after another vote, there is still a tie, the Ordinary may cast a deciding vote.
Can. 198.     The Ordinary or his representative presides over and has a vote at all meetings of the Council of Clergy in which it meets as one body, but does not preside over nor have a vote in the separate meetings of the House of Priests, the House of Deacons, or the House of Clerics, but does have a vote in the House of Bishops.
Can. 199.   
Sec. 1.    The Council for the Laity meets as one body for the presentation, consideration, deliberation of all measures to be voted on, and consideration and deliberation of all candidates for office.
Sec. 2.    Measures to be considered at Council for the Laity may be presented by any member. All measures to be considered at the Council for the Laity will be presented to the Council meeting prior to voting.
Sec. 3.    A two-thirds (2/3) majority is required to pass any measure voted upon by the Council for the Laity.
Sec. 4.   The Council for the Laity is a body serving the faith and the needs of the laity, but is not a governing body over anything that is properly for the clerical hierarchy or magisterium to determine.  

Congregational Assessments

Can. 200.      An annual fee known as the Congregation Membership Assessment may be assessed each parish according to the number of members of the parish.  This assessment fee will be determined by the Ordinary or an office appointed by him.  The assessment can be revised without amendment. The Ordinary may seek advice on the amount of the assessment from the Council of the Clergy, the Council of the Laity, either as a whole or by parish.
Can. 201.     Each Metropolitan See may levy an assessment on the dioceses in its province for works that will benefit the province or humanity as a whole.
Can. 202.     The Apostolic See may levy an assessment on each diocese and archdiocese in the Imperial Roman Church.
Sec. 1.    The Papa-Catholicos may raise funds as necessary.
Sec. 2.    The private charity of the Papa-Catholicos is known as the Purse of St. Stephen, the proceeds of which go to a charity or charities chosen by the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 203.     Each diocese will be supported directly and financially by its congregations, missions and non-parochial clergy. Said financial support will be of two kinds, viz., a tithe from the congregations or missions income; and the Congregational Membership Assessment, paid by all congregations or missions based on their membership.
Can. 204.   
Sec. 1.    The standard of support by all congregations, missions and non-parochial clergy for each diocese shall be ten percent (10%) of the total income of the Congregation or Mission, and of a non-parochial clergy it is 10% of the actual total income.
Sec. 2.    Payment will be made on the first day of each month, based on the previous month’s income.
Sec. 3.    Total income of the Congregation is defined as plate, pledge, and special gifts to the Congregation, excluding any special gift which is designated by the donor for a specific purpose (exemplified by, but not limited to Building Fund, Organ Fund, purchase of Stained Glass, and the like.)
Sec. 4.    This required support may be waived only by act of the Ordinary in individual cases.
Can. 205.     Parishes designated as Pontifical Basilicas, as they are exempt from direct leadership of their local Ordinary, pay only an assessment to the Apostolic See. 
Can. 206.     Non-parochial clergy not meeting their financial obligation (standard of support to their diocese) may not vote in Council of Clergy or the Council of Laity unless given a dispensation by the Ordinary.         
Can. 207.    Congregations or Missions not meeting their obligation to give financial support to their diocese shall not be given a vote in Council of Clergy or Council of Laity.  Neither clergy nor laity from that congregation will be given a vote.
Can. 208.     Mitigating circumstances for failure to meet onbligations of congregational or individual support may be presented to the Papa-Catholicos, or the relevant Metropolitan or Ordinary, and the Council of Clergy of the Apostolic See for consideration and action.

Metropolitan and Diocesan Clergy


Can. 209.    The Metropolitan and Ordinary may appoint clerics of his diocese to the office of Canon, Archdeacon, or Dean. A Dean may be of the diocesan or cathedral chapter, or may be a regional Dean, in charge of geographical portions of the diocese to assist the Ordinary in the administration of the diocese.
Can. 210.     The Ordinary may appoint such officers as necessary within his Curia in accordance with Canon Law, which shall include a Chancellor. Clerics designated as officers of the Curia hold prelatial status ex officio for the term of their office.
Can. 211.     A Rector is a Priest who has been elected Rector by the Congregation he is to serve and approved and installed by the Ordinary, and for whom that Parish is thereafter: That Priest’s full-time responsibility and; A source of income.
Can. 212.     Rectors may have split vocations or be part-time with the approval of their Ordinary, provided this best serves the needs of the local parish. 
Can. 213.    The consent of the Ordinary must be obtained before a congregation may call a Priest, and the Priest is not entitled to the benefits of the office of Rector until he has been officially installed by the Ordinary according to the ritual and form in the Pontificale Anglicanum.
Can. 214.     The appointment of a rector is at the discretion of the Ordinary. The Parish Council has no decision authority, but may be consulted for recommendations.
Can. 215.     Clergy other than Rector(s) may be titled: Vicar; Priest-in-Charge; Supply Priest; Deacon-in-Charge; Such other appropriate terms as the Ordinary may determine.

Admission of Clergy

Can. 216.     
Sec. 1.    Clergy of the Orders of Priest or Deacon of jurisdictions outside the Imperial Roman Church may be admitted as a Priest (or Deacon) Associate to the Apostolic See by permission of the Papa-Catholicos, or into any Suffragan See with permission of the Metropolitan Archbishop or Bishop Ordinary of that Suffragan See.
Sec. 2.    Priests (or Deacons) Associate may have full or partial priestly faculties at the discretion of the Bishop admitting them.
Can. 217.   
Sec. 1.    Clergy wishing to be admitted to a diocese within the Imperial Roman Church must apply first directly to the appropriate Bishop Ordinary and present evidence of good standing as a clergyman in his former jurisdiction, as well as any other materials or credentials the Bishop Ordinary may require.
Sec. 2.    The Bishop Ordinary may refer the matter to the Board of Examining Chaplains for recommendation, or may act on his own initiative.
Sec. 3.    The Bishop Ordinary, when he is satisfied that the clergyman is a proper candidate for admission to the Diocese, will recommend his admission to the Council of Clergy.
Sec. 4.    Each clergyman entering a diocese of the Imperial Roman Church must sign the Oath of Ordination, duly modified to reflect transfer rather than ordination, but maintaining the same spirit and intent, and other documents, including policy statements, as may be required.
Can. 218.     Clergy wishing to transfer out of their Diocese are required to secure a Letter Dimissory from his Bishop Ordinary to the Bishop of the gaining jurisdiction. As a matter of practice, such letters written by Bishops Ordinary should have the endorsement of the respective Metropolitan or the Patriarch.

Incorporation of Dioceses


Can. 219.     
Sec. 1.    The Ordinary of a particular diocese shall have the authority to incorporate said diocese as he sees fit as a non-profit religious corporation.
Sec. 2.    Any Articles of Incorporation or other legal documents of such a corporation must include acceptance of the Particular Canon Law of the Imperial Roman Church as binding regulations of operation.
Sec. 3.    The authority of the Papa-Catholicos, the Patriarchal Curia, and the Pontifical Court may not be limited by any such corporations.
Can. 220.      An Ordinary may create a sole-member corporation for his office while he is Ordinary.
Can. 221.     No corporation of any entity within the Church may be formed if such formation would relinquish, explicitly or implicitly, the sole right of the Church to govern itself.

Amenability and Citations of Clergy

Can. 222.   
Sec. 1.    A cleric of any order shall be amenable for offences committed by him, to the Bishop Ordinary of the Diocese in which he is canonically resident at the time the charge is made, and, if there be no Bishop Ordinary, or if he is a cleric of an Archdiocese, then to the Metropolitan; and furthermore all to the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 2.    If he is referred to the Bishop Ordinary, then the Canon Law of that Diocese shall apply, unless there is a violation of the Code of Canon Law of the Imperial Roman Church.
Sec. 3.    This Canon, except where stated, pertains specifically to the clergy canonically resident in a certain See.
Sec. 4.    All clerics are subject to the judicial authority of the Apostolic See in matters in which the Apostolic See claims pre-eminence or in which the Ordinary or Metropolitan fails to act.
Sec. 5.    All clergy by virtue of their clerical status agree implicitly to be subject to all laws, directives, regulations, citations, and proceedings of this Church.
Can. 223.     Unless the Ordinary or the Council of Clergy shall otherwise provide, a notice or citation required by any law of this Church to any cleric to appear, at a certain time and place, for the trial, hearing, or general enquiry pertaining to an offence, shall be deemed to be duly served upon him if a copy be given him personally, or be left at his last usual place of abode via Registered Mail, Return Receipt Requested or the equivalent, sixty (60) days before the day of appearance named therein, or to be sent via electronic post.
Can. 224.     It is the duty of all members of this Church to attend and give evidence, when duly cited in any Ecclesiastical trial or investigation under the authority of this Church.
Can. 225.     The Papa-Catholicos is immune from ecclesiastical trial, citations, and censure and cannot be removed from office.
Can. 226.     The Cardinals, the Canons of the Patriarchal Chapter, and the members of the Pontifical Court may only be brought to ecclesiastical trial with the permission of the Papa-Catholicos, and then, should they be accused of an offense against canon law, decrees, or regulations, they may only be brought before the Florentine Rota, the Supreme Holy Office, or directly to the Papa-Catholicos; and in the case of Cardinals, they may only be brought before the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 227.     A Bishop Ordinary or other Bishop within an Archdiocese may only be brought to an ecclesiastical trial by the approval of the Metropolitan or the Papa-Catholicos, and then only before the other Bishops of said Archdiocese. If insufficient Bishops are available, then other Bishops may be requested from other jurisdictions by the Metropolitan or the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 228.     A Suffragan Bishop within a Diocese may only be brought to an ecclesiastical trial by the approval of the Bishop Ordinary, the Metropolitan, or the Papa-Catholicos, and then only before the other Bishops of said Diocese. If insufficient Bishops are available, then other Bishops may be requested from other jurisdictions by the Ordinary, Metropolitan, or the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 229.     
Sec. 1.    A Bishop, Priest, Deacon, Sub-Deacon, or Cleric in Minor Orders of this Church shall be liable to presentment and trial for the following offences, viz.: Crime of immorality; Holding and teaching publicly or privately, and advisedly, any doctrine contrary to that held by this Church; Violation of the Code of Canon Law; Violation of decrees of the Apostolic See; Violation of Liturgical Norms; Any act which involves a violation of his Ordination Vows; Habitual neglect of the exercise of his Ministerial Office, without cause; or habitual neglect of Public Worship, and of the Holy Communion, according to the order and use of this Church; and Conduct unbecoming a Clergyman, to include insubordination to ecclesiastical superiors and the ecclesiastical hierarchy in general.
Sec. 2.    On being found guilty, he may be admonished or censured, may be suspended or deposed from the Ministry, may be given an interdict, or may be given an excommunication, as shall be adjudged by an appropriate Ecclesiastical Court under the authority of the appropriate Tribunal.
Can. 230.     In cases brought before the Tribunal against clerics, no presentment shall be made or conviction had for any offense, unless the offense shall have been committed within five (5) years immediately preceding the time of the presentment.
Can. 231.   
Sec. 1.    The Ecclesiastical Court, which shall act under the authority of the appropriate Tribunal, has the power to determine its own procedures in conformity with the rules set forth in this Canon.
Sec. 2.    The Bishop Ordinary, or in his absence or at his discretion, the Judicial Vicar or the Chancellor shall preside at sessions of this Ecclesiastical Court.
Sec. 3.    In any case wherein the Bishop Ordinary shall be an accuser and/or a witness for either side, he shall recuse himself, and the Judicial Vicar or the Chancellor shall preside. Likewise, neither of those officers shall preside if they are the accuser and/or a witness; in such a case, the next officer in the diocesan Curia in seniority shall preside.
Sec. 4.    The Judicial Vicar shall serve as the Chief Prosecutor unless impeded from doing so. the Judicial Vicar shall not serve as Chief Prosecutor if he is also presiding at the Ecclesiastical Court or otherwise serving as a judge.
Sec. 5.    A quorum of the Court shall consist of the Bishop Ordinary (or other officer in accordance with Canon Law or local procedure presiding), and two (2) other members, who shall be priests. However, if the accused is a Bishop, then at least one of the members of the Court shall be a Bishop.
Sec. 6.    The decision of at least two (2) of the three (3) members of the Court shall constitute a finding of the Court. If the Court consists of more than three (3) members, then a two-thirds (2/3) majority is required.
Sec. 7.    The accused shall have the right to demand that the Court present and make available to him all of his accusers for the purpose of examination by himself or his counsel.
Sec. 8.    In the event that the accused is a Diocesan Bishop, he may only be tried by the appropriate Metropolitan Tribunal or the Florentine Rota or Supreme Holy Office. If the accused is a Metropolitan Archbishop, he may only be tried by the Florentine Rota or Supreme Holy Office. Members of the Patriarchal Curia, Pontifical Court, and Pontifical Household may only be tried by the Florentine Rota or Supreme Holy Office, and then only with permission of the Florentine-Roman Pontiff.
Can. 232.   
Sec. 1.    In the matter of charges against a cleric, the finding of the Court shall be communicated to the Bishop Ordinary, who in the event of a finding of acquittal shall pronounce the accused acquitted and discharge the accused, or who, in the event of a finding in favor of conviction, may declare the accused acquitted notwithstanding such finding or convicted and pardoned, or shall declare the accused to be convicted and shall pronounce the sentence upon the accused.
Sec. 2.    This Canon does not abridge the right and responsibility of the Bishop Ordinary, in accordance with Canon Law, to suspend a cleric under his authority for cause, that in the godly judgment of the Bishop Ordinary is in violation of his ordination vows contained in the norms of this Church, or of Canon Law and other directives; provided that in the event of any such suspension, the clergyman so suspended shall retain all rights to trial and approval under Canon Law; and provided further, that, in the event that no formal charges are brought within thirty (30) days of such suspension, such clergyman shall thereupon be discharged from suspension. Sec. 3.    The Papa-Catholicos may suspend a cleric indefinitely for any reason.
Sec. 4.    Bishops Ordinary, Metropolitan Archbishops, Cardinals, and the Papa-Catholicos may issue Ecclesiastical Censure, Interdict, and Excommunication to clerics and laity. A cleric under Censure or Interdict may not exercise clerical duties under the specific terms of the censure or interdict, while said censure or interdict is in place. A cleric under excommunication may not exercise any duties of the clerical state until said excommunication is lifted.
Can. 233.     All that which refers to “Diocese” and “Bishop Ordinary” shall apply to “Archdiocese” and “Metropolitan” in terms of hearing cases in the first instance.
Can. 234.   
Sec. 1.    If a clergyman shall, after trial and pronouncement of sentence by the Bishop Ordinary, elect to appeal from the verdict and/or the sentence, he shall so notify the office of the Ordinary of his desire to appeal within thirty (30) days of his notification of the entry of the sentence by the Ordinary.  Such thirty-day period shall commence on the date when the notification of entry of sentence is postmarked by an appropriate official mail or courier service, or the Ordinary or his authorized representative hands the same to the appellant and shall expire on the thirtieth calendar day thereafter, and the appellants notice shall be deemed valid after said date of expiration.
Sec. 2.    Upon receipt of notification of appeal, the Bishop Ordinary shall arrange for an Ecclesiastical Appeals Court, under the authority of the Tribunal, consisting of different judges from the original case. The decision of this appellate trial may be appealed to the appropriate Tribunal of the ecclesiastical province, under the authority of the Metropolitan.
Sec. 3.    The decision of an appeals court in the Metropolitan Tribunal may be referred to the Florentine Rota for one or two turns, and then to the Supreme Holy Office. Decisions by the Supreme Holy Office may be appealed only to the Supreme Pontiff directly. The decision of a higher court may be to hear the case, or they may choose not to hear the case. In the latter situation, the decision of the lower tribunal stands, but may in such cases still be appealed to the Florentine Rota.   
Sec. 4.    If the Bishop Ordinary presided at the trial of first instance, then he may also preside at the appellate trial, or delegate this to another priest. If he presides, then the decision is final. If he does not preside, then he may hear the case again after the appellate trial.
Sec. 5.    All clergy may be pardoned by motu proprio of the Papa-Catholicos as supreme authority.
Sec. 6.    The Papa-Catholicos may authorise variations to the judicial procedures set forth in canon law as needed.

Parishes and Congregations

Can. 235.    A Parish is defined as a congregation in a specific area which is self supporting with a regular public meeting place and time, and who has a clergyman in residence, and which has been duly admitted to parish status in a diocese or archdiocese as hereinafter provided.
Can. 236.     A Mission Church is a non-self-supporting congregation established by a jurisdictional Bishop.
Can. 237.     Each Parish Congregation determines the details of its own governmental structure, subject to Canon Law and diocesan procedures.
Can. 238.     Each Parish may, immediately upon admission to the See in which it is resident, file application for corporation charter and articles of incorporation as a non-profit religious organization under the laws of the nation and state or province wherein it is domiciled, provided that the status of being a non-profit corporation does not interfere with the religious principles and practices of the parish.
Can. 239.     Each Parish that is incorporated shall keep on file with the See in which it is resident a current copy of the Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws of the Parish and all government tax and employer identification numbers. The authority of the Papa-Catholicos, the Patriarchal Curia, and the Pontifical Court may not be limited by any such corporations. Likewise, the authority of the Bishop Ordinary and Metropolitan may not be limited by any such corporations.   
Can. 240.     
Sec. 1.    Lay Officers of a parish may be elected and appointed according to Canon Law. However, a parish need not have lay officers.
Sec. 2.    The Lay Officers of the Parish may include: Senior Warden; Junior Warden; Secretary; Treasurer; and one or more Member at Large of the Parish Council.
Sec. 3.    The Elected Officers of the Parish are the Senior Warden, the Secretary, and the Treasurer. The Junior Warden may be either elected or appointed by the Rector as directed by a decision of the congregation.
Sec. 4.     The Rector or Priest in Charge serves as the President of the Parish Council and in his absence the Senior Warden presides at meetings of the Parish Council. The Rector has sole authority in the parish over matters of faith, doctrine, liturgy, and worship.
Sec. 5.    The jurisdictional bishop in which a parish resides may dissolve a Parish Council for cause.
Can. 241.     In a mission church the Senior Warden is appointed from the members of the congregation by the Bishop with a recommendation of the congregation. The Senior Warden serves as the President of the Committee that governs the mission. The Priest assigned to the Mission Church can be elected to serve as a member of the committee that governs the mission.
Can. 242.     A Parish may be admitted to the diocese in which it is domiciled by the Bishop Ordinary, generally upon recommendation by the Council of Clergy, provided that:     It subscribes to the Code of Canon Law; it subscribes to all policies and procedures of the diocese; and it has no conflicting ties to any other religious body. A Parish may be conditionally admitted to the diocese by the Bishop Ordinary, with the advice and consent of the Council of Clergy, subject generally to ratification by the Council of Clergy at its next session.
Can. 243.     All of the property of individual Parishes remains the property of the Diocese in which it is resident, under sole control of the Bishop Ordinary, unless the Bishop has granted specific ownership, in part or in whole, to the parish; which grant must be in writing.
Can. 244.     Parishes seeking to leave their diocese are deemed to be schismatic.
Can. 245.      If a parish is permitted to transfer Dioceses within the Imperial Roman Church, then its property and ownership thereof transfers to the new Diocese, under control of the receiving Bishop. Disputes pertaining to this may be referred to the Papa-Catholicos, whose decision is final and legally binding.
Can. 246.    Disputes regarding matters of parish property are to be taken to the diocesan Tribunal. The decision thereof is considered binding arbitration, and may only be set aside by the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 247.      A Parish may dissolve itself for reasons of need. If it does so, it must also follow all local legal procedures for dissolution of its corporation. Upon dissolution of a Parish, the assets of the Parish shall transfer in ownership to the Diocese in which the parish was resident.
Can. 248.     If a Diocese dissolves, then its assets and property are transferred in full or in part to a successor Diocese by the Apostolic See of Saints Stephen and Mark, if there is such a successor. If transfer is in part, the remainder is transferred, retained, or disposed of at the discretion of the Apostolic See. Else, if there is no successor diocese, the Apostolic See obtains sole ownership of the assets and property.
Can. 249.    The final legal binding arbiter of property held by any and all entities of the Imperial Roman Church and its affiliated auxiliaries shall be the Papa-Catholicos.

Tribunals of the Apostolic See

Can. 250.    The court of first instance of the Apostolic See of Saints Stephen and Mark, as well as the first court of appeals from decisions of Metropolitan Tribunals, is the Florentine Rota, headed by its Prefect. The Tribunal shall operate according to its operating procedures, as defined under the authority of the Prefect in accordance with Canon Law and approved by the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 251.     
Sec. 1.    Decisions of the Florentine Rota may be appealed to the same tribunal again. A different turn of judges shall be used for the second hearing of the case. Alternatively, the Tribunal may refer the matter to a higher Tribunal, which Tribunal may refer the matter back to the Florentine Rota for a second turn.
Sec. 2.    A decision upheld by a second panel of judges within the Florentine Rota is not heard again by the Florentine Rota, but may be heard by the Supreme Holy Office.
Can. 252.   
Sec. 1.    The Tribunal of the Patriarchal Penitentiary, headed by the Patriarchal Penitentiary Major, is the Tribunal responsible for: 1) Hearing of disputes between confessors and penitents. 2) Granting of dispensations related to restrictions on sacramental marriage under Canon Law. 3) Hearing of appeals on decisions of the Florentine Rota regarding invalidity of marriage based on restrictions under Canon Law (The Patriarchal Penitentiary does not hear appeals of annulment decisions.) 4) Processing and deciding requests for release from excommunication. (In the case of excommunication by the Papa-Catholicos, the tribunal processes the request, but does not render a decision.) 5) Hearing of appeals for release from interdict or censure. (In the case of excommunication by the Papa-Catholicos, the tribunal processes the request, but does not render a decision.) 6) Maintaining the list of indulgenced acts. 7) Other duties as assigned.
Sec. 2.    The Tribunal of the Patriarchal Penitentiary shall operate according to procedures established in accordance with Canon Law by the Penitentiary Major and approved by the Papa-Catholicos.
Can. 253.     The Tribunal of the Patriarchal Penitentiary only hears appeals from the decisions of the Florentine Rota if the matter pertains to the duties of the Penitentiary.
Can. 254.     
Sec. 1.    The Supreme Holy Office is the highest judicial authority of the Imperial Roman Church.
Sec. 2.    The Supreme Holy Office hears appeals from the decisions of the Florentine Rota on all matters.
Sec. 3.    The Supreme Holy Office is headed ex officio by the Prefect of Faith and Doctrine.
Sec. 4.    The Supreme Holy Office shall operate according to procedures established by the Prefect in accordance with Canon Law and with approval of the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 5.    The decisions of the Supreme Holy Office may be appealed only by decision of the Papa-Catholicos.
Sec. 6.    The Supreme Holy Office is generally a court of second or third instance, though it may also serve as a court of first instance on matters of faith and doctrine and otherwise as needed.
Sec. 7.    In all matters of annulment pertaining to marriages of Bishops, the decision of the appropriate Tribunal is referred automatically to the Supreme Holy Office, who must review the case and uphold the decision of the lower Tribunal in order for the annulment to be granted. Else, the annulment is voided.

General Legislation

Can. 255.    Confirmed communicants in good standing, 18 years of age or older may be licensed as Lay Readers by their jurisdictional Bishop for the purpose of reading the Epistle at the Divine Liturgy, reading the burial office in the absence of a deacon or priest, or leading Divine Offices. Admission as a licensed Lay Reader does not constitute admission to the Minor Order of Lector unless the person so admitted is both a man and first receives the First Tonsure and then is formally ordained as a Porter and then as a Lector, all with proper intent to enter the Minor Orders of the clerical state.
Can. 256.     All Lay Reader licenses shall be renewed at the discretion of the jurisdictional Bishop, by application, on the first of each calendar year.
Can. 257.     The regular collar, being a white shirt collar, or a common Roman clerical collar may be worn by all Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Sub-Deacons, and clerics in Minor Orders, as well as tonsured clerics, major seminarians, and minor seminarians.
Can. 258.     Licensed Lay Readers, as they are not members of the clergy, are not entitled to the clerical collar, unless also religious or commissioned to the Minor Orders.
Can. 259.     Voting by proxy is prohibited in all bodies of the Imperial Roman Church.  However, proxy voting in parish meetings may be permitted by specific by-law in a Parish or Mission.
Can. 260.    The Sacramental privilege against disclosure of communications and absolute seal of secrecy extends not only to the Confessor/Priest, but also to any interpreter or other person to whom knowledge acquired from confession may come. Any person, whether clergy or laity, who divulges the contents of a Sacramental Confession that he knows only through confession, or that which he heard in confession but knew outside of confession in such a way that in any way identifies, explicitly or implicitly, the penitent to one or more third parties without express consent of the penitent shall incur latae sententiae excommunication reserved to the Papa-Catholicos. The provisions of this canon apply to any communication in which, in the judgment of the priest, a priest-penitent relationship and situation exists, whether a formal form of a Sacremental Confession takes place or not.
Can. 261.       Non-sacramental, private communications received by a clergyman or employee of any See of this Church in a pastoral or professional capacity shall not be divulged except with the express prior permission of the person making the communication, or in order to prevent the commission of a serious crime; and in the case of the latter, unless there is insufficient time to prevent such crime, the permission of the relevant jurisdictional bishop shall first be obtained.
Can. 262.    Communications among clergy or pastoral teams for the purposes of consultation are fully subject to all of pertinent Canon Law. Where these Canons permit such confidential information to be shared, it must be unmistakably identified as such, and all who come into possession of it are bound by the strictures of these Canons.
Can. 263.    No information deemed confidential or reserved by a jurisdictional bishop, a Metropolitan, a Cardinal, or the Papa-Catholicos shall not be divulged by any person having such knowledge to any person, authority, government, or institution without permission of the authority that defined said informaton as confidential or reserved. Said information may be divulged to the relevant Bishop Ordinary, Metropolitan, Cardinal, or to the Papa-Catholicos without violation of this canon.
Can. 264.     Committees, organizations, task forces and like groups desiring to organize or, being organized, to affiliate under the auspices of a diocese shall make application to its respective Council of Clergy, which shall investigate and make its recommendation as required to the respective Ordinary. The decision of the Bishop, whether to permit the applied for affiliation or to deny the same, shall be final.
Can. 265.     The Ordinary may establish such commissions or ad hoc committees deemed necessary for the continuation and expansion of the diocese under his authority.
Can. 266.     As a general principal in this Code of Canon Law, that which is applicable to Bishops Ordinary in their respective dioceses is applicable to Metropolitan Archbishops in their respective archdioceses, but not in their greater provinces except where provided by Canon Law or other directives and procedures.
Can. 267.     The Apostolic See and all Suffragan Sees shall operate on the principal of ecclesiastical common law where this Code of Canon Law is silent.
Can. 268.     Acting in the favor of the Faith, the Papa-Catholicos, as supreme spiritual and temporal authority, may render decisions on matters, even in contravention of the entirety of this Code of Canon Law and Ecclesiastical Common Law, provided such acts do not violate Doctrine or Sacred Scripture. Acts carried out by motu proprio do not set precedent in common law except for potential future acts by motu proprio, or as directly provided in the motu proprio.
Can. 269.    In accordance with Sacred Tradition, the Papa-Catholicos has no earthly superior in authority. The Papa-Catholicos cannot be deposed and further cannot resign except as provided in Canon Law and tradition.
Can. 270.    Those, whether members of this Church or not, who persecute the Supreme Pontiff of the Imperial Roman Church, cause personal injury to him, take action against him in any way, cause harm of any type to him, detain him, or imprison him shall be guilty of high treason. This applies not only to the principals of the action, but also to those intellectually responsible for the wrong, the originators, participants, and auxiliaries. They and their male descendants incur the penalties of excommunication, reserved to the Apostolic See, infamy, confiscation, loss of testamentary rights, and loss of civil offices. 
Can. 271.    The Papa-Catholicos-Elect, provided that there is not a reigning Papa-Catholicos, and even if not yet consecrated a Bishop, has the right to the use of pontifical regalia. If not a bishop, he nevertheless has quasi-episcopal jurisdiction within his own diaconal church and among his own ecclesiastical family; thus there he can give the pontifical blessing and grant partial indulgences of two hundred days, and he may confer the tonsure and minor orders on persons attached to that church or who is part of his ecclesiastical family. These privileges herein stated commence immediately upon proper acceptance of the office.
Can. 272.    The Papa-Catholicos and the Papa-Catholicos-Elect (if there be not a reigning Papa-Catholicos) may grant benefices in all locations and likewise may exercise corrective and disciplinary authority in all locations on any matter in any way to pertains to the Imperial Roman Church. This immediate authority pertains but is not limited to, as temporal successor of St. Peter, the Basilica of St. Peter the Apostle, to the Archfather’s residences in Rome, and to any and all locations within Rome and the Pontifical Imperial States of Rome-Ruthenia.
Can. 273.    The Papa-Catholicos ranks as Caesar August, Emperor, and Prince of the Blood and is successor to the Roman Empire by right as temporal successor to St. Peter the Apostle. When present within the territory of a monarchy, he takes place, as the Prince of the Romans, immediately before a reigning sovereign and royal princes. The Papa-Catholicos also has the right to a gala train of four.
Can. 274.    Cardinals and the Grand Dukes of Rome are entitled to a gala train of four and rank as imperial Princes of the Blood. The rank and title of Grand Duke of Rome is held by right by the members of the Pontifical Household of the Papa-Catholicos of Rome-Ruthenia. It represents the highest rank of noble title within the Pontifical States and ranks immediately below the dignity of Cardinal. The Grand Dukes and Grand Duchesses hold the style of Imperial and Royal Highness. The title is specifically held by the following persons:  1) The immediate family of the Papa-Catholicos, i.e., any children, parents, and siblings; 2) The Grand-Duchess of Rome-Ruthenia and the immediate family thereof, i.e., any children, parents, and siblings; 3) The Electors of Trier, Mainz, Cologne, and Würzburg and their consorts. The Grand Dukes and Grand Duchesses in the first two categories are Grand Dukes/Duchesses of the Blood and are Princes and Princess of Ruthenia. Those of the third category are Electoral Grand Dukes and hold their grand ducal rank and title by virtue of their electoral office and title.
Can. 275.    Prelates and clerics who are princes or nobles may display within their coats of arms the appropriate crown or coronet of rank and use any heraldic badges thereof. Insignia of the orders of chivalry of the Pontifical States, the Holy See, the Holy Roman Empire, or any Christian State may be displayed within the cleric’s heraldic achievement.
Sec. 1.    Insignia of chivalric orders may be worn by clerics with house dress and civic dress as appropriate to the occasion.
Sec. 2.    Insignia of chivalric orders may be worn by clerics with choir dress, academic dress, or court dress as appropriate. However, such insignia is not generally used at liturgy except at liturgy related to the specific order or to chivalry in general.
Can. 276.    No cleric under the jurisdiction of the Apostolic See may be charged with an offense, arrested, or brought to trial  by any outside court, tribunal, or jurisdiction of any sort without the express permission of the cleric’s religious superior. This is defined as the Bishop Ordinary, Metropolitan, or Archfather for a cleric, the Metropolitan or Archfather for a Bishop Ordinary, and the Papa-Catholicos for a Metropolitan.
Can. 277.    Those who persecute a Bishop, cause personal injury to him, cause him harm of any kind, detain him, or imprison him without permission as defined under Canon Law shall be guilty of a high offense. This applies not only to the principals of the action, but also to those intellectually responsible for the wrong, the originators, participants, and auxiliaries. They and their male descendants incur the penalties of interdict, reserved to the Apostolic See, with terms set within the document of interdict, not to exceed those set forth regarding high treason against the Papa-Catholicos as defined in canon law. 
Can. 278.    Those who persecute a cleric not a bishop, cause personal injury to him, cause him harm of any kind, detain him, or imprison him without permission as defined under Canon Law shall be guilty of a high offense. This applies not only to the principals of the action, but also to those intellectually responsible for the wrong, the originators, participants, and auxiliaries. They and their male descendants incur the penalties of ecclesiastical censure, reserved to the Apostolic See, with terms set within the document of censure, not to exceed those set forth regarding high treason against the Papa-Catholicos as defined in canon law.


 

 

 

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